30Q Great Carouser 16(?)

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Postby Catmando » Fri Jun 30, 2006 10:57 am

Was the composition created after 1839?
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Postby GreatCarouser » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:34 am

Catmando wrote:Was the composition created after 1839?


20. (or 19....need a ruling....) No
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Postby Catmando » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:44 am

Guesses haven't counted towards the questions, so I rule 19.

You haven't responded to my: Is it a waltz for piano question?
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Postby bignaf » Fri Jun 30, 2006 11:47 am

guessing: Andante Spianato and Grand Polonaise
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Postby Catmando » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:07 pm

I'm also guessing:

Fantasy on Polish Airs for piano and orchestra in A major, Op. 13, CT 41
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Postby GreatCarouser » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:19 pm

bignaf wrote:guessing: Andante Spianato and Grand Polonaise


"I have begun the polonaise with orchestra [op. 22] but this is only the start and there is no beginning" - from a letter to T. Woyciechowski

So wrote the master in 1830....four years later he was to write that beginning..the Andante spianato although the pieces both stand on their own. I believe so much of what we think of as 'great' in Chopin is contained in the 8 or 9 minutes it takes to play the Grande Polonaise Brilliante (op 22) it surprises me that it isn't more prevalent in the repertoire of concert pianists. I particularly enjoy two versions: Rubinstein's last recorded version (1964) that is included in Vol 48 of the RCA series called 'The Rubinstein Collection'. Rubinstein recorded the Polonaise three times in this collection but the last version is the best in my opinion. He is also using a magnificent Hamburg Steinway on this recording and it is a wonderous instrument in his hands. I like to play his version and then follow it with Horowitz's 1945 recording which is reproduced on RCA's 'Horowitz plays Chopin Vol 1'. Both recordings also include splendid renditions of Polonaise-Fantaisie (op 61) in Ab.

Its amazing especially for one who might assume that playing Classical music from a rigid format (scored) could produce such variances in tempo and interpretation. The Rubinstein is almost relaxed and sedate compared with the Horowitz which is brilliant and rhythmic and comic in comparison yet both capture much of what I believe the composer intended....perhaps that is also a measure of Chopin's greatness....

Congratulations *ig! :D
Last edited by GreatCarouser on Sat Jul 01, 2006 2:04 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Catmando » Fri Jun 30, 2006 12:24 pm

Congrats Mr. *ig! :D Again! :shock:

GC/*ig, would you say that Chopin was the greatest composer of piano works?
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Postby bignaf » Fri Jun 30, 2006 1:02 pm

GreatCarouser wrote:
bignaf wrote:guessing: Andante Spianato and Grand Polonaise


"I have begun the polonaise with orchestra [op. 22] but this is only the start and there is no beginning" - from a letter to T. Woyciechowski

So wrote the master in 1830....four years later he was to write that beginning..the Andante spianato although the pieces both stand on their own. I believe so much of what we think of as 'great' in Chopin is contained in the 8 or 9 minutes it takes to play the Grande Polonaise Brilliante (op 22) it surprises me that it isn't more prevalent in the repertoire of concert pianists. I particularly enjoy two versions: Rubinstein's last recorded version (1964) that is included in Vol 48 of the RCA series called 'The Rubinstein Collection'. Rubinstein recorded the Polonaise three times in this collection but the last version is the best in my opinion. He is also using a magnificent Hamburg Steinway on this recording and it is a wonderous instrument in his hands. I like to play his version and then follow it with Horowitz's 1945 recording which is reproduced on RCA's 'Horowitz plays Chopin Vol 1'. Both recordings also include splendid renditions of [i] Polonaise-Fantaisie (op 61) in Ab.

Its amazing especially for one who might assume that playing Classical music from a rigid format (scored) could produce such variances in tempo and interpretation. The Rubinstein is almost relaxed and sedate compared with the Horowitz which is brilliant and rhythmic and comic in comparison yet both capture much of what I believe the composer intended....perhaps that is also a measure of Chopin's greatness....

Congratulations *ig! :D


I agree. Rubinstein's last is the best recording ever of this. his one with orchestra isn't nearly as good. the CD also has a great recoding of the Barcarolle I believe.
*ig, would you say that Chopin was the greatest composer of piano works?

yes.
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Postby GreatCarouser » Fri Jun 30, 2006 1:02 pm

Catmando wrote: GC/*ig, would you say that Chopin was the greatest composer of piano works?


I wouldn't have either the technical expertise or the wide exposure to the many great composers of music for the piano to make that judgment. I will state that the layers and chromatics in Chopin exceed much of what I hear in others' work and the level of the work in general is high. He certainly was able to 'lay it out' for his audience. If you listen to this piece(s) without the 'orchestra' you can certainly imagine it being played by an orchestra without a piano (at least I can) but the piano might be the perfect voice for the expression of the piece.
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Postby GreatCarouser » Sat Jul 01, 2006 2:11 am

bignaf wrote:...I agree. Rubinstein's last is the best recording ever of this. his one with orchestra isn't nearly as good. the CD also has a great recoding of the Barcarolle I believe.


There are only Polonaises on vol 48 of the Rubinstein collection CD...Rubinstein recorded many of Chopin's works and most are included in the collection but not in this particular album....The Horowitz volume has Etudes, waltzes, a Ballade or two and perhaps the Barcarolle...It is all live recordings save for the Andante and the Grande Polonaise...most from concerts given in the early 1970's.
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Postby bignaf » Sat Jul 01, 2006 9:13 pm

I have them on the RCA Chopin collection also, but I don't find the numbers. anyway, I have the Polonaise CD and the Andante Spianato&Grande Polonaise is not on it. it's on the Misc. CD which includes the impormptus, the fantasie impromptu, and the Barcarole etc. maybe they released to forms of the Chopin Collection.
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Postby GreatCarouser » Mon Jul 03, 2006 12:39 am

bignaf wrote:I have them on the RCA Chopin collection also, but I don't find the numbers. anyway, I have the Polonaise CD and the Andante Spianato&Grande Polonaise is not on it. it's on the Misc. CD which includes the impormptus, the fantasie impromptu, and the Barcarole etc. maybe they released to forms of the Chopin Collection.


Just to clarify, the Vol 48 I refer to is the numbering of the Rubinstein collection on RCA which is a collection of all of Rubinstein's authorized recordings and includes his recordings of many composers besides Chopin. That volume includes 6 Polonaises, the Polonaise-Fantaisie as well as the Andante spianato and the Grande Polonaise Brilliante. It was originally recorded in 1964 as a stereo version of the same pieces Rubinstein had previously recorded for RCA Victor in 1951 and in 1935. Both of those are also in the collection but have earlier volume numbers. The 'Horowitz plays Chopin vol 1' is recorded on RCA Gold label and includes pieces other than polonaises.
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Postby bignaf » Mon Jul 03, 2006 8:29 am

oh, I know that collection, I have some Brahms on it, and the mazurkas. they come in those booklet-like CD holders.
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