Hooked on Classics

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Hooked on Classics

Postby serge urtizberea » Fri Dec 15, 2000 2:27 am

Does anyone remember this little foray into the make-classical-popular-again category? I dubbed the original by Fiedler and the Pops off an old LP many years back (and still have it!) along with the sequel performed by the Cincinatti Pops. I used to really enjoy those medleys, and I wonder if anyone else did. Supposedly, the 'Hooked on' series had been created to popularize young people to c.m. How successful was it? Does anyone cringe at the recollection of that abhorrent bastardization of the entire c.m. repertoire? (hopefully no...)<P>Also, is it available on CD? Not that I want it...
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby ~Leslie » Fri Dec 15, 2000 9:42 am

It was in the 70's when disco was all the rage, and I heard it over the airwaves plenty. It consisted of snippets of great classical motifs modulating neatly from one to the next to form a medley, over mechanical disco ~#:0 drum loops. The sublime juxtaposed over the ridiculous. <g> <P>At the time, ppl were into dancing, glam & Saturday Night Fever, and couldn't seem to get enough of that particular rhythm.<BR> <BR>Beethoven's 5th got a top billing, with a jazzy clavinet noodling improv within, I can still hear it in my head, though it's been many years .....<BR>This all came after Deodato's jazz version (sans the disco beat) of Also Spracthrustra (2001, a Space Odyessy), which enjoyed marginal success in airplay. <BR>A few years ago, I cringed when one of my clients wanted to ride to a Stephen Foster/Americana version from the same Hooked on Classics recording. However repulsive the disco beat, the audience connection was overwhelming, thanks to the familiar catchy hook melodies of this compilation. <BR>Did it boost classical music? I think so, at least temporarily,<BR>to a certain extent. ~
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby Symbio » Fri Dec 15, 2000 10:49 am

Hola,<BR>just replied for a minor correction of Leslie's posting:<BR>The correct name of the 2001-Theme is:<BR>'Also Sprach Zarathustra'.<BR>Isn't it amazing that Stanley Kubrik actually had a completely different score in mind while editing the movie's final version. Than, suddenly he changed his mind (fortunately) and used classical music (Strauss).....
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby Peter » Fri Dec 15, 2000 2:14 pm

Here in the U.K., `Hooked on Classics` was a no.2 hit for Louis Clark & the Royal Philharmonic, in 1981.<P>Speaking of `Saturday Night Fever` & Beethoven`s 5th, what about that disco abomination, `A Fifth of Beethoven`, by Walter Murphy & The Big Apple Band, featured in said film? This Beethoven composition (?!!) was a U.S. no. 1 hit in 1976.
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby shostakovich » Sat Dec 16, 2000 1:51 am

Good topic again, Serge. I remember Hooked On Classics less than fondly. I only HOPE they led pople to the original sources.<BR>Symbio, the Hartford (CT) Public Libe has the "original soundtrack" for 2001 by Alex North, a first rate film composer. I will some day check it out. If anyone is already familiar with it, please respond.<BR>Peter, I thought the Walter Murphy versions were a damn sight better than the Hooked On jumbles. The Chopin prelude was quite pleasing. By the way, I noticed you are in Portsmouth. William Walton wrote an overture, Portsmouth Point, about the hustle bustle at the harbor, based on a 19th C. sketch by Thomas Rowlandson. What can you tell us about Portsmouth Point? Thanks.<BR>Shos
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby ~Leslie » Sat Dec 16, 2000 2:12 am

Simbio, Thanks, LOL! that was a fine example of the early stages of Alzheimer's wasn't it?<g><BR>No matter, I knew you guys would keep me on my toes. Time to go take my Gingko now, CU , Cheers~
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby serge urtizberea » Sun Dec 17, 2000 7:13 am

It's good to see you here, Leslie! Thanks, everybody, for that little slice of disco-meets-the-world history. I hope never to see SNF again, but somehow, HOC holds a [small, small] special place in my heart.
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby Peter » Mon Dec 18, 2000 5:58 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by shostakovich:<BR><B>Good topic again, Serge. I remember Hooked On Classics less than fondly. I only HOPE they led pople to the original sources.<BR>Symbio, the Hartford (CT) Public Libe has the "original soundtrack" for 2001 by Alex North, a first rate film composer. I will some day check it out. If anyone is already familiar with it, please respond.<BR>Peter, I thought the Walter Murphy versions were a damn sight better than the Hooked On jumbles. The Chopin prelude was quite pleasing. By the way, I noticed you are in Portsmouth. William Walton wrote an overture, Portsmouth Point, about the hustle bustle at the harbor, based on a 19th C. sketch by Thomas Rowlandson. What can you tell us about Portsmouth Point? Thanks.<BR>Shos</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><BR>HI SHOSTAKOVICH!,<BR>I am touched by your interest in my home town! The city of Portsmouth is famous as a sea port, and its importance has always been in its strategic position, geographically, in the middle of the south coast of England. The city is steeped in sea-faring history, but alas, I am not sufficiently well-endowed with the knowledge which I know I really SHOULD possess, to stray too far from this basic outline of the place Image.......<BR>HOWEVER(!), The Point is a landmark, so-called because (and I`ll be forced into hiding if this is wrong!!) it marks the spot, in relation, and in closest proximity, to Portsmouth`s adjacent naval island, Gosport, at which Portsmouth harbour, with its shoreline military/naval establishments, flows into the river Solent; and from there, into the open sea.<BR>Sorry this is all a bit meagre, but for now it`s pretty much the best I can do!<BR>PS. The river Solent separates Portsmouth from the Isle of Wight, which you may recognise from The Beatles` "When I`m 64". <p>[This message has been edited by Peter (edited 12-19-2000).]
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Re: Hooked on Classics

Postby shostakovich » Mon Dec 18, 2000 6:25 pm

Thanks, Peter, ya done good. Believe it or not, your info adds to my enjoyment of the Walton piece. It's only about 6 minutes long, and very perky. Try it out if you get the chance. As for the Beatles, it took me a long time to like what they did when they were 24. I've arrived at Yesterdays and Hey Jude, so far. <BR> Paul McCartney is a class act. For a guy who admits to not being able to read music, he's gone quite a way. I remember long ago when the group was awarded the order of MBE (Member of the British Empire), a lot of people who had been awarded that honor sent theirs back to the queen. And now SIR Paul ---- . The Times, They Are a-Changin'
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