Music PWing

Chat with fellow classical music fans about your favorite composers. Ask a question about your favorite composition. Musicians are encouraged to post their ideas about music or a performance! This forum is for classical music fans from all around the world! Join in a classical conversation today.

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Postby navneeth » Fri Apr 13, 2007 11:50 am

Thanks, Shap. :) Those quotes and that picture are new to me, too. There was a one-page article in a magazine about Einstein and his love for music. (Actually, the whole issue was about him.) Only subscribers can see it now, although one thoughtful student had a pdf of the article in his site. I lost the link. :( I'll try to get the link, which has his more popular quotes.

I remember one from the book 'The Expanded Quotable Einstein'.

"Mozart wrote such nonsense here," after finding it hard to play one of his violin sonatas(I think). :D
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Postby Catmando » Fri Apr 13, 2007 12:02 pm

navneeth wrote:Thanks, Shap. :) Those quotes and that picture are new to me, too. There was a one-page article in a magazine about Einstein and his love for music. (Actually, the whole issue was about him.) Only subscribers can see it now, although one thoughtful student had a pdf of the article in his site. I lost the link. :( I'll try to get the link, which has his more popular quotes.

I remember one from the book 'The Expanded Quotable Einstein'.

"Mozart wrote such nonsense here," after finding it hard to play one of his violin sonatas(I think). :D


And many people confuse Albert Einstein with Alfred Einstein, the well-known musicologist.
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Postby navneeth » Thu Apr 19, 2007 3:10 am

B.D.Bach (Big Daddy Bach, aka Johann Sebastian Bach) also has a keyboard version of his BWV 1041. He probably has harpsichord, keyboard, oboe, bassoon and whatnot versions of other concertos, as well. I'm seriously thinking that he has no more than a couple hundred original compositions to his credit. :roll:
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Postby Catmando » Thu Apr 19, 2007 6:54 am

navneeth wrote:B.D.Bach (Big Daddy Bach, aka Johann Sebastian Bach) also has a keyboard version of his BWV 1041. He probably has harpsichord, keyboard, oboe, bassoon and whatnot versions of other concertos, as well. I'm seriously thinking that he has no more than a couple hundred original compositions to his credit. :roll:


He's still by far the most influential composer ever.
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Postby barfle » Thu Apr 19, 2007 8:05 pm

I keep wondering where they teach someone how to play the Brandenburg well enough that you could solo with it.
:crazy:
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Postby Trumpetmaster » Fri Apr 20, 2007 5:42 am

barfle wrote:I keep wondering where they teach someone how to play the Brandenburg well enough that you could solo with it.
:crazy:


Which Brandenburg?

When I was at Juilliard a flute player
decided to perform Brandenburg No. 2 for her recital.

I was asked to be the trumpet player for this performance.
A true honor and humbling experience as that is one of the most difficult works (way too many high notes) in trumpet literature.

The recital hall was packed that night.
Every brass player in the school was there.
Let me tell you... I had the worst case of nerves, but the performance went very well. I have an old cassette recording from that night
and occassionally listen to it. Brings back many fond memories.

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Postby barfle » Fri Apr 20, 2007 9:54 pm

Trumpetmaster wrote:Which Brandenburg?


There are trumpet concertos (as I'm sure you know), violin concertos, double bass concertos (as I'm sure HRH knows), and there are brandenburg concertos. But I've never seen a brandenburg, much less known of anyone who plays one.
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Postby DavidS » Sun Apr 22, 2007 9:45 am

barfle wrote:
Trumpetmaster wrote:Which Brandenburg?


There are trumpet concertos (as I'm sure you know), violin concertos, double bass concertos (as I'm sure HRH knows), and there are brandenburg concertos. But I've never seen a brandenburg, much less known of anyone who plays one.


I often wondered the same thing about an aranjuez.
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Postby shostakovich » Sun Apr 22, 2007 3:44 pm

I just checked my Spanish dictionary. Arana means spider, and juez means judge. Dare we combine them?

When Bach sent his groveling note to the margrave, I believe he was playing the Brandenburg.
:wink:
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Postby Trumpetmaster » Mon Apr 23, 2007 5:18 am

The Brandenburg concertos (BWV 1046–1051) by Johann Sebastian Bach are a collection of six instrumental works presented by Bach to Christian Ludwig, margrave of Brandenburg-Schwedt[1], in 1721 (though probably composed earlier). They are widely regarded as among the finest musical compositions of the Baroque era.

Brandenburg Concerto No.1 in F major, BWV 1046
Brandenburg Concerto No.2 in F major, BWV 1047
Brandenburg Concerto No.3 in G major, BWV 1048
Brandenburg Concerto No.4 in G major, BWV 1049
Brandenburg Concerto No.5 in D major, BWV 1050
Brandenburg Concerto No.6 in B-flat major, BWV 1051


Here is the Wikipedia link that provides additional info....
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brandenburg_concertos
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Postby Shapley » Mon Apr 23, 2007 8:10 am

But I've never seen a brandenburg, much less known of anyone who plays one.


When they're hot, they just make a sort of dull 'tok', but when they're cold, they have a nice ring to them.

Oh! Wait, that's a branding iron, not a brandenburg. Sorry. :roll:
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Postby Trumpetmaster » Mon Apr 23, 2007 11:56 am

Info on Bach & Brandenburg

Bach decided to look around for somewhere new. It may perhaps have been these circumstances which led Bach to revive an old invitation to produce what are now known as the Brandenburg Concertos. We know from the opening of this dedication, dated March 24th 1721, that Bach had already met the Margrave of Brandenburg, at which time Bach had been invited to provide some orchestral music.

"History shows no record of Bach's having subsequently visited the Margrave at his Brandenburg Court. There could be many reasons for this. The Margrave was not easily accessible as he was more frequently to be found in residence at his estates at Malchow than in Berlin. Moreover the death of Johann Kuhnau, Cantor of the Thomasschule at Leipzig in June 1722 opened the possibility of an appointment for Bach at Leipzig, perhaps more attractive to him than Berlin. Leipzig was situated in familiar territory where he already had many musical and courtly connections; in addition it had a famous university, and the three-times-yearly Trade Fair gave the city a distinctly cosmopolitan atmosphere. "
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Postby navneeth » Sun May 06, 2007 2:18 pm

ImageImage
God, I hate your music!

Have a great birthday, guys! :mrgreen:
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Postby Catmando » Mon May 07, 2007 7:48 am

Interesting that they have the same birthday :)

Arguably the 2 greatest Romantic era composers (considering Beethoven as Classantic era) :P
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Postby navneeth » Tue May 29, 2007 1:04 pm

A couple of interesting "videos" I came across on YouTube.

First, (supposedly) Joachim playing Brahm's first Hungarian Dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-p8YeIQkxs

and then, a series of images of Beethoven from birth to death, set to the music of the Cavatina from his string quartet No.13. Very nicely done.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwzvMslu7e0
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Postby Catmando » Wed May 30, 2007 6:53 am

navneeth wrote:A couple of interesting "videos" I came across on YouTube.

First, (supposedly) Joachim playing Brahm's first Hungarian Dance
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-p8YeIQkxs

and then, a series of images of Beethoven from birth to death, set to the music of the Cavatina from his string quartet No.13. Very nicely done.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LwzvMslu7e0


Thank you for sharing this with us Nav. I've already listened to the Cavatina more than a few times. I like all of the portraits of Beethoven that I haven't yet seen, it's very interesting! :D
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Postby Shapley » Mon Jul 09, 2007 8:50 pm

I'm sick to death of hearing about Live Earth.
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
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Postby navneeth » Tue Jul 10, 2007 1:52 am

Shapley wrote:I'm sick to death of hearing about Live Earth.

I guess it must've been all the carbon emissions from those concerts. :roll: :wink:
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Postby Trumpetmaster » Tue Jul 10, 2007 6:09 am

Shapley wrote:I'm sick to death of hearing about Live Earth.


DITTO

:rant:
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Postby Haggis@wk » Fri Jul 13, 2007 1:27 pm

Need some expert input. On a scale of 1-10 how difficult is El Salon Mexico to play? I attended a local Youth Orchestra in Dallas who played that as well as a Poulenc Concerto and Tchaikovsky's 5th and I have to say that I was very,very impressed.

I thought the piece they had the biggest problem with was El Salon Mexico and I wondered if that was because of the difficulty
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