Expresso Kamuchea

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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby jamiebk » Sun May 24, 2009 12:44 pm

tan wrote:There were quite a few snakes around, one even moved into the straw roof for a while and scared the rats away: in panic they left the premises. The cat keeps the rats under control these days.
But the strange thing is, ever since i have chickens, not a snake has been seen around. I always thought that it was an urban(?) myth, but no, :D this belief turned out to be true, chickens keep snakes away....


Tan, what kind of snakes do you encounter? I must admit myself to being somewhat frightened of them for various reasons.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby jamiebk » Sun May 24, 2009 12:44 pm

tan wrote:There were quite a few snakes around, one even moved into the straw roof for a while and scared the rats away: in panic they left the premises. The cat keeps the rats under control these days.
But the strange thing is, ever since i have chickens, not a snake has been seen around. I always thought that it was an urban(?) myth, but no, :D this belief turned out to be true, chickens keep snakes away....


Tan, what kind of snakes do you encounter? I must admit myself to being somewhat frightened of them for various reasons.
Jamie

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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Mon May 25, 2009 6:42 am

Bill will have to go back to pp yet again. He is very much my only friend hereabouts. The rest of that bunch here, aww man you can smoke them inna pipe (as the Germans would say) ngos full of themselves and no idea what this country is all about: Christians translating the bible into phnongs- first they had to make a written language, as phnongs an oral culture...
and then f. f…se, the French again: the latest, as usual, as nothing changes and the French think they own the world or at least this part of the world anyways, the new rubber= plantation. At bousra, where the beautiful jungle and the waterfall and the home of the phnongs were... Now… not anymore, the French came took over 300 000 hectares of jungle, killed the nature, jugged out the phnongs- no recommendation for their land- and planted rubber trees. Ass holes, excuse my French here for once. ..
yeah sure, as I have the only restaurant in town worth the name and then some, they came and wanted food, and brought their ‘security ‘guys, doing target practice with their ak’s in my garden terrifying my staff- and me to be honest- and .. Aww get this one their manager is Belgian and worked in the Congo before and he is delightfully stupid, saying things like: aww well you get all these beautiful plantations and the jungle gets cleaned up... (?????) Is that guy for real???.... He is: I Called him Conrad Kurtz to his face AND this little idiot says who’s that… so... whatta am I gonna do now: yes, right: I threw them outta my place. I might be a sewer rat, but no, no way, I will not live with that bunch (speak trash)…you wanna eat well, I said, learn how to cook!!!
Of course they did not but hired Dmitri, the French – so called chef who lost bhp to my restaurant. Fine I think, trash to- French trash. And I am off the hook. ( imagine, one morning – that was before I kicked them out, two gun touting policemen were standing in my garden at 7 am inna morning. whaa.???????? right- we want your tel. number. why, I said, ….- they said, and I said,well you ain''t gonna get it, I Said and: get outta here. They did. Turned out the French bunch wanted to make a reservation and called the police to Make it for them. No way.) Then last Tuesday I decided to give it an early night and...Go to sleep with CSI (Miami) on the DVD and a some soup.
Aww, no way they banged on the door, their minions – waving guns – the French want dinner. Eff 0ff! I told them, you got Dmitri to cook for u. after some geese and Elvis they did leave… the French have destroyed my life once in snooky- I go as far away as I know to go in this country and here they are, again bent on destroying what is there- and thinking they got an effing right to do so….
One gets so tired... and in my case very, very angry. And sure I do need the money, but no, not this way…
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Mon May 25, 2009 6:58 am

hehE , todaYS PP POST, TO CONTINUE AND TELL A BIT MORE ABOUT THAT BUNCH: :mrgreen: :deal: :crazy: :crazy:
WELL THE FRENCH THOUGHT THEY WOULD GET A PUFF PIECE, WELL THEY DID NOT, WHAT CAN I SAY, ONE'S GOTTA HAVE FRIENDS/ ITS NOT WHAT ONE KNOWS BUT WHO'/, OR JUST THAT THE TRUTH WILL COME OUT, NO MATTER WHAT?
::::
Plantation highlights struggle of development and preservation
Written by Christopher Shay and Sebastian Strangio
MONDAY, 25 MAY 2009

Ethnic minority community says a giant rubber conglomerate is destroying its traditional culture, as plantation officials insist that the company is bringing much-needed work to the area.

Photo by: SEBASTIAN STRANGIO
Ethnic Phnong houses sit on recently cleared rubber plantation land in Mondulkiri's Bou Sra commune.

Mondulkiri Province
FIVE months after an angry mob smashed and burned machinery belonging to a local rubber company in Mondulkiri province's Bou Sra village, ethnic minority residents in the area say their culture and livelihoods remain in danger from new plantations that have displaced them from their ancestral farmlands.

"They've lost hope," said Bill Herod, an adviser for Village Focus Cambodia who works with Phnong youth in the provincial capital Sen Monorom.

"We in the West talk negatively about slash-and-burn, but this is slash-and-burn by the company."

According to an article in Science, the expansion of rubber plantations in Southeast Asia could double or triple by 2050, doing far more damage than traditional farming methods.

And while the Bou Sra plantation owners say they seek to balance their interests with those of the local communities, residents and advocates say the situation is symptomatic of the unrestrained development that is harming other indigenous populations.

Residents in Mondulkiri say more than 800 families in seven villages - the majority of them from the Phnong ethnic minority - have had plots of land taken by the rubber plantation, claiming there was no consultation prior to the granting of the concessions.

"They just came and took my land," said Umbarup Sherup, a Bou Sra village resident who said he received no compensation from the company.

When we came to meet the company [they] said they would take the land whether we agreed to it or not.

Another resident, who declined to be named, said the villagers were not given a choice.

"When we came to meet the company, [they] said they would take the land whether we agreed to it or not," the resident said. "Now we have nothing."
here an article in the pp post about that bunch, they thoughtto get a puffpiece, well they did not...
eeeh you gotta have friends, cand the french do not and we do.. whoopie!!!!

In late 2007, government authorities granted 2,500 hectares in economic land concessions to a joint venture between the local Khaou Chuly Group and the French rubber conglomerate Socfin.

In early April, Khaou Chuly Group President Khaou Phallaboth signed an agreement with Minister of Agriculture Chan Sarun granting his company a further 2,705 hectares in the area.

"We hope to receive a total economic land concession of over 20,000 hectares from the government by 2010 to grow rubber trees," Khaou Phallaboth told the Post at the time.

After clearing began last year, village representatives travelled to Phnom Penh in June to deliver a personal plea to Prime Minister Hun Sen.

The dispute came to a head in December, when a frustrated group of villagers destroyed machinery belonging to Khaou Chuly Group.

"No one is happy with them. They do whatever they want, and they don't care about the people," said one Phnong community representative, who declined to give her name for fear of reprisals. "In the future, the Phnong people will die out because we have no forests."

Chith Sam Ath, executive director of the NGO Forum on Cambodia, said an investigation by his organisation found that the rubber project had led to the loss of traditional agricultural land, water supplies and spirit forests, and had impeded access to schooling for some village children.

"Socfin or Khaou Chuly [should] focus strongly on consultation with the community regarding environmental impacts and impacts on their livelihoods ... and find a solution with the community before they start their project implementation," he said by email.

When contacted by the Post, Kao Phallaboth declined to comment in detail, saying day-to-day management was in the hands of Socfin officials.

Reversing the damage
Socfin sources say that following the burning of the tractors, managerial control was assumed by their company, which says it has adopted a more conciliatory approach.

Socfin General Manager Philippe Monnin said the company was doing all it can to help the community and offset the impact of the plantations.

At Socfin's invitation, Monnin said Medicins du Monde, a French NGO, had helped construct a local hospital, and that the company hoped to bring in the French governmental development agency AFD to revitalise the community.

"Our plan is to get NGOs to work with us to take care of the community and ensure what we are doing is a model," Monnin said during an interview in Bou Sra village. "We want to do something proper, but it will not be easy."

He said that of the 10,000 hectares planned for the rubber plantation, 3,000 hectares would remain as spirit forests for the Phnong. He also added that Socfin was now conducting an environmental and social impact assessment of the plantation as part of its master plan, as well as sending an ethnologist and sociologist to study the situation.

He said the plantation would provide regular employment for Phnong. From May until August, he said, the company would double its daily manpower to 1,000 workers, who would earn 20,000 riels ($5) per day on the plantation.

Mondulkiri Deputy Governor Yim Lux told the Post that Socfin was paying US$15,000 a month in wages for local workers, and said it was providing "fair" compensation to the villagers affected by the plantation.

"The company agreed to compensate the people whose farmland was impacted, either with a plot of land or with cash," he said, but added that negotiations were still in progress.

Monnin said that Socfin, as a French company that needs to maintain a positive global image, was more vulnerable to criticism than other rubber companies in Cambodia.

"It [development] is inevitable.... If we were not here, it would be the Vietnamese, and then for the Phnong it would be the end," he said.

But many of the Phnong villagers said the Vietnamese state-owned Daklak Rubber Co, which has a plot adjacent to Socfin, has treated the Phnong more equitably.

"If people disagree with the Vietnamese company, they don't destroy the land. When the Vietnamese company does [harvest] the land, they give half [the profits] to us," one villager said.

Officials at Daklak's Mondulkiri headquarters declined to comment in detail about their rubber operations.

Too little too late
Critics of Socfin say the company's actions come too late and that irreparable damage has been done.

"Mistakes have been made by all key partners involved, including the Cambodian government and the company. ... Forest was destroyed, a Phnong graveyard was bulldozed, and [these] can't be undone," Herod said.

According to Cambodian environmental law, Herod said, an impact study should have been completed before the concession was awarded. He also noted an increase in drunkenness and other disorders related to social disintegration among the underemployed Phnong.

But despite indigenous land protections existing under the country's 2001 Land Law, villagers insist the Phnong community was not consulted.

While there is intermittent work on the plantations, the Phnong representative said the loss of rotational farmland forests meant that local communities faced an uncertain future.

"Now that the company has come here, they are very strict and will not allow the Phnong to cut wood on company land," she said. "Before they had the freedom to cut the forests and grow crops. Now they say the land is French; the sky is French."

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY SAM RITH

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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby analog » Mon May 25, 2009 5:50 pm

Tan, is Is this the outfit ?

Website: http://www.socfin.be

Phone: +32 2 511 65 70

Address:
2, place du Champ de Mars
1050 Bruxelles,
Company Description
Socfin-Ste Financiere des Caoutchoucs SA(SOCFIN). The Company's principal activity is its operation as a Holding Company. PLANTATIONS AND AGRO-INDUSTRIAL ENGINEERING: rubber, palm oil, banana and pineapple plantations; FINANCIAL SERVICES: banking in Belgium principally through Financiere Privee and Socfininter; HOLDING COMPANIES: in the agricultural, financial, property and industrial sectors.
Key People
Vice Chairman Comte Edouard de Ribes
Chairman Hubert Fabri


i was unable to get to a website.

Sometimes bypassing the bureaucracy with a handwritten letter to the CEO works wonders.

I'd send him a copy of Heart of Darkness.
I remember being struck by last paragraph of that story - the tide flowing out from London harbor all over the world......

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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Mon May 25, 2009 6:24 pm

..yep that's them all right!
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby dai bread » Mon May 25, 2009 8:13 pm

Of course if they hadn't upset the villagers, they wouldn't need all those Aid groups & assorted NGOs.

Yet another example of capitalism at work- privatise gains, socialise losses. We pay for those NGOs, either by donation or Govt. grant. What does the rubber company contribute, and does that contribution (if any) get added on to the price we pay for its products? It will certainly be tax-deductible.
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby analog » Tue May 26, 2009 12:25 am

hmmm..... whoever this NGOforum is, they seem aware if ineffective..
there's laws on the books that aren't working?

http://www.ngoforum.org.kh/Land/Docs/In ... IA_final(3).pdf
The Cambodian Land Law (2001) grants collective land ownership rights to indigenous communities. This offers a unique chance for indigenous peoples in Cambodia to exercise their right to self-determined development. However, the provisions of the Land Law related to indigenous communities have not been implemented and are frequently violated, favoring powerful private and state interests, attracted to exploit the economic potential of areas traditionally occupied by indigenous peoples. Alienation of land and forest from indigenous communities has become the major threat to local livelihoods and traditional knowledge. It is destroying the local community landscape. Continued support and the involvement of the international community are needed to safeguard the rights of Cambodia’s indigenous peoples, including recognition of their traditional livelihoods and the registration of their communal lands.



Thanks Tan .

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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Tue May 26, 2009 12:56 am

.. Ouch, sometimes on has to eat one’s words: just had an unpleasant encounter in the river, so not formally on my land strictly speaking... I was inside minding my own business, when some awful screaming got my- and the dogs and the geese’s attention. Sounded like a cat in distress to me, all my pets including kittens accounted for, still the screaming goes on and is quite blood curling. At the edge of the river where the bank is extremely steep and overgrown, I find the spot where it is coming from and try to see what is going on. Can’t see nothing, the screaming goes on. So I jumped into the inner tube and approached the bank from the water side, more screaming. Carefully I; parted the grass, and promptly fell in., sunk into the mud. Lost my crocks- and floundered for some, hanging on to the reeds, when… aww! No! the back of the head of a snake, a big one., as big as my hand… grey green and the ridges, oh me, I flopped backwards, floundered somehow- fear makes strong I guess- back into the inner tube, and eventually onto dry land…the screaming got week then stopped. I try to tell myself that maybe it was just a rat or some such, but I don’t think so, what is was we, will never know, what I do know, and could do without is: it was a pit viper and an awfully big one too. Looked it up in the snake book hoping is was just some harmless serpent, but aww, no way, looked again a pit viper all right.
Those beasts are fatal, normally I am not very impressed with snakes, even poisonous ones, but vipers here are aggressive and deadly poisonous and no antidote until snookyville…give me a cobra anytime over these!!!
We have those, king and spitting, keel backs, golden tree snakes, coral snakes, those are the more poisonous ones, and further more plenty of non poisonous ones, amongst the pythons.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Tue May 26, 2009 1:04 am

.. One thing that was maybe not quite as clear in the article as it could have been: the ADF (agence developmentale de france) is paying these colonials lice, actually subsidising this fatal caper. Now they make some concerned sounds, and flip and flop, nothing efective anyhow and still foot a big part of the bill, and the villagers, ha! they get nothing, development help, french style indeed.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby Shapley » Tue May 26, 2009 8:49 am

Glad you escaped unscathed. I'm no fan of snakes, and they have a distinct advantage in the water.

I ran across a copperhead yesterday while weedeating. Small one, but scary enough. I'm glad I chose to use the weedeater rather than pull the weeds by hand.
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Tue May 26, 2009 10:00 am

tan wrote:..We have those, king and spitting, keel backs, golden tree snakes, coral snakes, those are the more poisonous ones, and further more plenty of non poisonous ones, amongst the pythons.

To quote the received wisdom from some survivors of the USA's Indochina adventure, there's a hundred different kinds of snakes there, 99 of them are poisonous and that last one is so big he just eats you whole.

I don't like snakes. I especially don't like snakes that are close to me!
>^..^<
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Wed May 27, 2009 6:18 am

aww,the rains are coming down like there is no tomorrow, the road is 'broke, 'as the khmers would say, no matter how hard the Chinese try to get and keep the road functional : mud and washed out bridges, the bus falling through a bridge, trucks knifed over the road, and stuck vehicles are the order of the day. ( bill came back yesterday, garnished with mud, waving the miraculously intact shopping from PP) today no vehicles made it in, some poor people will spend the night in the jungle with the rains and the mud for company..., not fun....
did I say we will never know what animal it was that the snake ate, wrong again: Bung Serei's tom is MIA since the time of the screams, evidence points to the fact that the poor tom, (who was not so innocent, prowling the hood to get a go at the kittens and kill them), was killed himself by the serpent.
So far we have not heard from the bousra french, we can't wait to see their faces with the pp post egg all over them: maybe they do not know yet, because roads and communication with bousra is not working due to the rain, or they do not know how to react( that will be the day), or do they choose to ignore it??/ we'll see....
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby tan » Thu May 28, 2009 6:52 am

ok, this should be fun..
take a look at this picture, can you figure out what this contraption is for??
.. took me month to figure it out ( these are all over kamong cham province and have recently made their appearance in senmon...)...
Image
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby jamiebk » Thu May 28, 2009 9:12 am

Looks like some sort of water collection system to me. Ths picture is a bit small so it's hard to grasp the scale of it.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby DavidS » Thu May 28, 2009 9:39 am

Could it be a snare for catching birds in mid flight, who don't notice the transparent plastic material, crash into it, and stunned, fall into some collection vessel below from which they can't escape?
Tel grain, tel pain.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby BigJon@Work » Thu May 28, 2009 10:55 am

Water purifier?
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby analog » Thu May 28, 2009 12:36 pm

BigJon@Work wrote:Water purifier?


that'd be my guess, a solar still?

around here stills are wood fired and made of copper .......
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby jamiebk » Thu May 28, 2009 3:18 pm

I have seen contraptions like that used in foggy cool areas to actually trap/pull water out of the air. They work like trees to condense the fog into droplets and let it drip down to the catch basin. Since it comes directly from the air, as long as the catch basin and catch cloth are reasonably clean you can drink it without further filtering or purification. Simiilar thing with rain water. Quite a bit of water can be captured this way.
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Re: Expresso Kamuchea

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Thu May 28, 2009 10:18 pm

Yup. I'm finally home where I can see photobucket postings, and that there gauzy object looks like a mistcatcher. Droplets of mist gather on the netting, run down into a container, and you've got clean drinking water. I wouldn't have expected it someplace as wet as Cambodia - rainwater would be clean, yes?

At least that would be my first guess. Unless you've got some monster spiderweb racers or some such sporting enterprise. :confused:
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