Air Force

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Re: Air Force

Postby Shapley » Wed Sep 09, 2009 11:20 am

Casandra,

We never asked what you're looking for in regards to the service. Do you have a specific field you are looking at? Are you thinking of Avionics? Are you wanting to travel? Are you wanting looking for educational opportunities? Are you looking at the officer programs?
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Re: Air Force

Postby Schmeelkie » Wed Sep 09, 2009 6:16 pm

Casandra, here's my brother's reply:
"First off, the first day will suck, no two ways about it. We got in late, 11pm or midnight-ish, I think and after some preliminary in-processing, we were escorted to our barracks and shown our bunks. We were told that reveille is at 5am, which was true. What we /weren't/ told was that they would be coming through at 4am to get us up and get things started. It was a Friday morning, and getting the early start was actually a good thing, even though the day was long, because, by
days' end, we'd all gotten our first haircuts, uniforms issued, and other gear bought with our first payment. Basic is 6 weeks of training, which for us, stretched into roughly 7 weeks due to some holiday time. The actual amount of time spent at Lackland depends on the time of year you are there. I went from mid-January through the end of February, and we had cold weather (wearing our jackets, gloves and hats with the flaps down to protect our ears), and warm weather (it hit 84F on a day when I was wearing my winter weight camouflage). In the summer, I understand there are days when they don't do hardly anything outside due to the high heat and humidity. Remember, Lackland is in San Antonio, deep in the heart of Texas. If you are there in the hot weather, drink your water.

Since I was there in early '93, things have become more physical, and they've added what they call a "warrior week" where you are living outside, doing survival type things, which is probably not as bad as it sounds. I think I'd have enjoyed that more than the one day we had on an obstacle course. Speaking of survival, to get through the training as a whole it's good to know some things going in: everything you do in the first week or two will be wrong, and you all will be yelled at about
it. This doesn't mean you shouldn't do your best, just expect for them to find something wrong. So long as your flight (the group of people occupying your barracks with you) can work well together, things will get easier as you go along. I wouldn't recommend volunteering for a high profile job, at least not early on. The people who get stuck with those jobs take a lot of flak and often get replaced pretty quickly. I managed to get a low profile job, which I held through the end. As part of a crew, if we messed up, there was someone in charge of us who took the heat. We might have all received some sort of punishment, but if you go in thinking you'll never get punished, you're in for a shock. Just know that the whole thing is a game. Try to work with the others in your flight and make them see that working together is the best route. The better you all do, the more liberties the instructors will give you and the less they'll be around ... and believe me, you'll want them to not be around much after a short time. Don't take things too personally, pay attention to detail, work well with others and things will go smoothly.

I'd highly recommend having at least a good idea of what field you'd like your job to be in before you get there, if you don't go in having a guaranteed job already. I went in knowing I'd have an electronics job, I just didn't know what. I got very lucky and got my first choice of jobs, though. (Schmeelkie note - I think recruiters can work with you on this) But speaking of jobs, make sure you know what you're getting into before you sign your life away, because changing jobs once you're in isn't always that easy. It's not impossible, but they spend a lot upfront training you for one thing, and if you then decide you don't like it, they're not really too happy about sending you off for more training. The early part of your technical school (which comes after Basic) is somewhat like Basic, but then it gets much more relaxed.

The things you'll learn early on, like making beds, folding your clothes, drill (marching), etc., may seem mundane, but it's all about attention to detail and discipline. Excel at these things and things will go smoothly for you. Use what little free time you are given wisely. Maybe your boots could use another coat of polish, maybe you really need a shower lasting longer than 30 seconds, or maybe you just need some rest. Speaking of wise choices: take the GI Bill. The benefits for those serving post 9/11 have just been significantly increased. They deduct $100/month PRE-TAX for you first 12 months after you are done with Basic, and the benefits are good for 10 years after you get out of the service. Right now, if I was going to school
full-time, I'd be receiving GI Bill benefits of over $1000/month. That's breaking even within two months! You can't beat that deal, and even if you don't think at the time that you'll go back to school, you never know and it's SUCH a good investment, you almost can't afford NOT to take it.

Again, USAF Basic is more physically demanding now than when I went through, but it's only a few weeks and nothing that most people can't get through. When I was there, as I understand it, they were at a low point for physical fitness training. Still, I lost 15 pounds during the time I was there, and I'd love to be back to that weight now.

Finally, just take it day by day, and expect to be wrong a lot. That's the best advice I think I can give looking back at my experience of over 16 years ago."

Hope that helps! And good luck with whatever you decide! :D
"Up plus down equals flat" Pumpkin, 3 yrs, 10 mo, July '07
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Re: Air Force

Postby Serenity » Wed Sep 09, 2009 8:57 pm

Here....it's exactly like this....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8Nf1MK7lts
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Re: Air Force

Postby OperaTenor » Fri Sep 11, 2009 10:41 am

Haggis needs to weigh in on this thread.
"To help mend the world is true religion."
- William Penn

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Re: Air Force

Postby piqaboo » Fri Sep 11, 2009 11:24 am

Casandra needs to come back.
Altoid - curiously strong.
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Re: Air Force

Postby Haggis@wk » Mon Dec 14, 2009 1:41 pm

piqaboo wrote:Casandra needs to come back.


Today's the first I've seen it. I'm not sure my experiences of 1967 would be relevant. I suspect the bullying that I experienced is long gone. Many of us enlistees were treated as "draft dodgers" -- not an unreasonable accusation, I enlisted to avoid the draft -- by some older T.I.s. I had the advantage of coming from a USAF family and already knew most of the ropes. Although that same familarity got me in trouble when I refered to my instructor as "sarge."

Today you have to be a non-smoker to even join. We were kept away from cigarettes for no more than two weeks (I recall, maybe it was 10 days) After reading Schmeelkie brother's account it seems like the basics (no pun intended) remain essentially the same. Just about every one I know who went through basic have at least one habit developed there that they still practice. In my barracks, to save time, everybody on the top floor took a shower at night and everyone on the bottom floor got theirs in the morning. I still shower at night. I also fold my underwear, socks and tee shirt the same way I was taught in basic. Even the MRHYN folds them the way I learned.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Air Force

Postby barfle » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:15 pm

I hang my shirts facing left, which is how I was taught in the Army but (strange as it may seem) it actually offers a few advantages. You can actually find the front of the shirt in the dark.
--I know what I like--
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Re: Air Force

Postby Shapley » Mon Dec 14, 2009 5:35 pm

We sailors weren't taught to hang shirts. We folded them all. We didn't have hanging lockers in Boot Camp. We had them in 'A' school, but they didn't do room inspections in the manner they were done in Boot Camp. They did "health and safety" inspections, which entailed looking inside the room to ensure that there were no foodstuffs, live animals, or dead women.

On the carrier our locker was integrated into the bunk, so it did not permit hanging, either. Hanging lockers were also available, but there weren't enough for everyone, so you had to acquire some seniority before you got to put your lock on one.

We also had a variety of fan rooms and vent spaces which doubled as 'overflow storage', although such storage was not specifically authorized. You had to request permission to use the area as an office or work area. Once such permission was granted, you could locate lockers, storage boxes, desks, etc., which provided extra storage. That was one of the luxuries of living on the carrier. One of our larger vent spaces, the one known as the 'bowling alley', probably had as much storage space as that whole sardine can that OT spent his career serving aboard.

We had our own Reactor Electrical Department library in one of the spaces. I had a number of books stored there, but we also had probably every Louis Lamour Western and an impressive collection of Sci-Fi novels. There was also a number of issues of "Heavy Metal" magazine there. We also had one of the early Macintosh computers and an Apple computer rip-off called the "Apricot".
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Re: Air Force

Postby BigJon » Thu Dec 17, 2009 10:12 pm

piqaboo wrote:Casandra needs to come back.

Casandra was a spammer, (observe, but don't click, the links in her sig.) doubt she'll be back. You guys need to tune your radar. :mrgreen:
Even a blind nut finds a squirrel once in a while. – Me! Feb 9, 2001
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Re: Air Force

Postby piqaboo » Fri Dec 18, 2009 12:09 pm

so?
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