Memorial Day

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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Haggis@wk » Tue Jul 21, 2009 9:42 am

Shapley wrote:Medieval Battle Records Go Online

Apparently, the office of the exchequer had an obsession for accuracy, leaving behind a detailed account of the pay records of those who served the king. I'm sure the penalty for innaccuracy was pretty stiff, so the obsession was probably warranted.


The origins of many military formations and roll call were to ensure the exchequer, or whoever held the purse strings, that everyone they were paying for was present.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Mon Dec 07, 2009 10:50 pm

Well, before it officially ends, I'd like to raise a toast to the men who died on this date 68 years ago. Remember Pearl Harbor, always.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Sun Dec 13, 2009 9:55 pm

Charles C. "Tip" Clark, of my home town, passed away December 11, 2009. I found it interesting that he died on the 65th anniversary of his being shot down over Germany.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Haggis@wk » Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:40 pm

When two people do the right thing...it's a must read about a genuine hero (five bronze stars and two purple hearts) who was finally laid to rest properly.

Ashes Found in Trash Led to Proper Burial

January 05, 2010
St. Petersburg Times

The two teenagers got to the cemetery first. He wore his dark green dress uniform from the National Guard. She wore a long black dress. They stood on the edge of the road, across from rows of matching military headstones, waiting for the funeral of the man they had never met.

Mike Colt, 19, and his girlfriend, Carol Sturgell, 18, had driven more than an hour from their Tampa homes last month to be at Florida National Cemetery in Bushnell.

They weren't really sure why they had come. They just knew they had to be here.

"It's kind of sad, huh?" asked Sturgell, scanning the sea of white gravestones.

Colt nodded. "Yeah, but it feels kind of important."

At 12:20 p.m., a Tampa police car pulled up, then a white Lincoln Town Car. Another police cruiser followed. Two officers stepped out.

"Thank you for being here," Colt said, shaking both of their hands.

"No, thank you," said Officer Dan College. "If it weren't for you guys, none of us would be here."

More than a month ago , on the last Saturday of November, the young couple was hanging out at Sturgell's house when her brother rode up on his bike, all excited. He had found two fishing poles in this huge pile of trash. Come check it out, he said. So they did.

At the edge of the trash mound, sticking out from beneath a box, Sturgell spied a worn green folder.

She pulled it out, brushed off the dust. Across the top, bold letters said, "Department of Defense." Inside, she found retirement papers from the U.S. Army; a citation for a Purple Heart issued in 1945; and a certificate for a Bronze Star medal "for heroism in ground combat in the vicinity of Normandy, France ... June 1944." In the center of the certificate there was a name: Delbert E. Hahn.

Why would anyone throw that away? Sturgell asked.

And who is that guy? Colt wanted to know. Must be old, a World War II vet. Looks like he served at D-Day!

That night, they took the paperwork back to Sturgell's house and searched Delbert E. Hahn on the computer. Nothing. They talked about who he might have been, the life he might have led.

The next morning, they went back to the trash heap and searched for more clues. They rummaged through boxes, overturned furniture, picked through piles of the past. Colt moved a ratty couch - and something fell out. A metal vase, or box, some kind of rectangular container about a foot tall. On the base was the name: Delbert E. Hahn.

"It's him," Colt told his girlfriend. "This must be him, in his urn."

Sturgell screamed. She didn't want to touch it. It was kind of freaky, she said, discovering the remains of some dead guy.

"He shouldn't be here," Colt said. "No one should be thrown away like that, just left in a parking lot."

The dead man wasn't alone. Under the couch, the couple found two more sets of remains: a cylinder-style container with Barbara Hahn printed on the bottom and another urn, which had no name.

Tampa police Cpl. Edward Croissant had just reported for the night shift that Sunday when his officers showed him the urns. This kid and his girlfriend had found them and brought them to the station.

Then an officer told Croissant about the Purple Heart. The Bronze Star. And the Normandy invasion.

And Croissant became irate. He had served eight years in the Navy. He's in the Coast Guard Reserve. "I had three uncles in World War II. That was the greatest generation. If it wasn't for those men, we would have nothing," he said.

"That man saw combat. And someone just dumped him there? He deserves a better ending."

Police called the Department of Veterans Affairs and learned Hahn had died in 1983, at the age of 62, -and was a highly decorated war hero. The staff sergeant had served in the infantry and been honored with five Bronze Stars and two Purple Hearts.

Barbara Hahn, they learned, was the soldier's wife.

So how did their remains end up in that mound of garbage? Where was the rest of their family, or friends, anyone who would want their ashes? And who was in that third urn?

Neighbors filled in some of the story: Barbara Hahn had been a widow forever, they told police. For years, her mother had lived with her. Her mother's name was Barbara, too.

The elder Barbara had lived to be more than 100. They thought she died around 2000. That third urn, neighbors told police, must be her.

The younger Barbara, the soldier's wife, got sick in 2003. A couple came to care for her, and she wound up willing them her mobile home. When she died, the couple moved in, took out a mortgage, then didn't make payments.

The bank foreclosed on the trailer late last year.

In November, officials sent a maintenance company to clear it out. The workers must have just dumped everything behind the vacant building on Busch Boulevard, neighbors told police. Including the remains of three people.

Just before 1 p.m. Dec. 16 , the two teenagers led the car line through Florida National Cemetery. Police followed, then the funeral director who had the urns. Outside a wooden gazebo, two rows of National Guardsmen stood at attention.

The funeral director handed the first soldier a flag, the next one the cylinder with Barbara Hahn's remains, the third one the brass urn with Delbert Hahn.

(Barbara's mother's remains are still in the evidence room of the police station. Since she wasn't a veteran or married to one, she wasn't entitled to be buried in the military cemetery.)

"Let us open the gates of the Lord," said a military chaplain, who led the procession of strangers into the gazebo. "Let us remember," said the chaplain, "none of us lives only unto himself."

The teenagers sat on the front bench. Three officials from Veterans Affairs sat behind them. They had spent weeks searching for the Hahns' relatives, any distant kin or friend, someone who might want their ashes - or at least want to come to their burial.

They couldn't find anyone. Even the couple whom Barbara Hahn had willed her home to didn't show.

By the time the chaplain lifted his head from the Lord's Prayer, a long line of men had wrapped around the gazebo.

Wearing blue denim shirts and work boots, they clasped their caps in their hands and bowed their heads. Dozens of groundskeepers from the cemetery had left their Christmas party to come pay respects to the man who, in death, had been so disrespected.
A bugler played taps. The riflemen fired three shots. And 56 people watched the honor guard fold a flag over the urns of the man and woman they never knew.



Godspeed, Delbert Hahn.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Sun Jan 10, 2010 12:52 pm

I'm glad he finally got the burial he deserved. Sad that it had to be under such circumstances.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby dai bread » Sun Jan 10, 2010 3:35 pm

There's nothing much wrong with a country that has such people in it.
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Haggis@wk » Sun Jan 10, 2010 5:03 pm

dai bread wrote:There's nothing much wrong with a country that has such people in it.
Thank you. That's a nice comment and an observation that provides me with some sense of "rightness" in the world.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Tue Jan 12, 2010 12:16 pm

104-Year-Old Strongman, Decorated War Veteran, Dies After Being Struck By Car

A fascinating character. Part of a breed you just don't see anymore.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Haggis@wk » Wed Jan 13, 2010 2:39 pm

Officials identify Air Force pilot MIA from Vietnam War

WASHINGTON (AFRNS) -- The Department of Defense POW/Missing Personnel Office announced Jan. 12 that the remains of a U.S. serviceman, missing in action from the Vietnam War, have been identified and will be returned to his family for burial.

Air Force Maj. Russell C. Goodman of Salt Lake City, Utah, will be honored this week at Nellis Air Force Base, Nev., home of the U.S. Air Force Thunderbird demonstration team. At the time of his loss, Goodman was assigned to the Thunderbirds and was flying with the U.S. Navy on an exchange program. He will be buried in Alaska at a date determined by his family.

On Feb. 20, 1967, Major Goodman and Navy Lt. Gary L. Thornton took off in their F-4B Phantom from the USS Enterprise for a bombing mission against a railroad yard in Thanh Hoa Province, North Vietnam. They were struck by enemy antiaircraft fire and their plane exploded. Lieutenant Thornton was able to eject at just 250 feet altitude, but Major Goodman did not escape. Lieutenant Thornton survived and was held captive until his release in 1973.

Search and rescue attempts were curtailed because of heavy anti-aircraft and automatic weapons fire in the area of the crash.

Between October 1993 and March 2008, joint U.S.-Vietnamese teams led by the Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command investigated the crash site twice and conducted two excavations, recovering human remains and pilot equipment. The aircraft debris recovered correlates with the type of aircraft the men were flying.

Among other forensic identification tools and circumstantial evidence, scientists from JPAC and the Armed Forces DNA Identification Laboratory also used mitochondrial DNA -- which matched two of his maternal relatives -- in the identification of Major Goodman's remains.

For additional information on the Defense Department's mission to account for missing Americans, visit the DPMO Website at www.dtic.mil/dpmo or call 703-699-1169.

Godspeed, Major Goodman
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Haggis@wk » Wed Feb 24, 2010 1:41 pm

Colonel (R) Robert L. Howard


Today, at Arlington National Cemetery, we lay to rest COL(R) Robert L. Howard. The link for the interview is at the end of this email.

Read a bit about Howard at one of these links: The Robert L. Howard Tribute Website, The Congressional Medal of Honor Society Website, The Washington Post- Medal of Honor recipient Col. Robert L. Howard dies at 70.

COL(R) Howard was arguably America's most highly decorated Warrior ever, earning more awards for valor (10) than Audie Murphy, but he was surely America’s most highly living warrior until his death. The US Army Special Forces Command (Airborne) Biographical Sketch.

Wounded 14 times in 54 months of combat duty in Vietnam, Robert Howard was awarded 8 Purple Hearts and was believed to be the most decorated living American.
Colonel Howard served five tours in Vietnam and is the only soldier in our nation's history to be nominated for the Medal of Honor three times for three separate actions within a thirteen-month period. He received a direct appointment from Master Sergeant to 1st Lieutenant in 1969, and was awarded the Medal of Honor by President Richard M. Nixon at the White House in 1971. Colonel Howard is one of America's most decorated soldiers. His other awards for valor include the Distinguished Service Cross - our nation's second highest award, the Silver Star - the third highest award, and eight Purple Hearts. He was the last Vietnam Special Forces Medal of Honor recipient still on active duty when he retired on Sept. 29, 1992.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 9:37 am

I believe I mentioned a while back that I inherited a photo album from my Great-Uncle upon his passing. He was aboard the USS John D. Edwards (DD-216) operating out of Manila, P.I. from 1929 to 1931. I have scanned and uploaded some of those photos onto facebook. They can be viewed here:

USS John D. Edwards (DD-216)

I hope to scan some more this weekend.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby jamiebk » Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:14 am

I just reviewed the photos Shap and they are wonderful. You are indeed lucky to have come into posession of such an album
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:41 am

Some of the photos I can't publish. There are photos of the carnage of war: headless corpses, heaps of dead bodies, torture, etc. I do not know if they occurred during his time there (1929 - 1931), or were obtained by him from earlier or later incidents. The Shanghai Massacre was 1927, and I believe the US military presence was partly a response to that. I suspect he acquired the photos from those incidents. They are quite gruesome.

There are also rather gruesome photos from Russia taken around the same time period. I have no record of his being in Russia, other than the photos, but there is much about the man I do not know. The location in Russia is not identified, only "Somewhere in Russia after World War I". This label had to be added later, since 'World War I" was called "The Great War", or "The War To End All Wars" until there was a World War II.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 10:48 am

Oh, BTW, you don't need a facebook account to view the photos.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby jamiebk » Fri Mar 05, 2010 11:55 am

Shapley wrote:Some of the photos I can't publish. There are photos of the carnage of war: headless corpses, heaps of dead bodies, torture, etc. I do not know if they occurred during his time there (1929 - 1931), or were obtained by him from earlier or later incidents. The Shanghai Massacre was 1927, and I believe the US military presence was partly a response to that. I suspect he acquired the photos from those incidents. They are quite gruesome.

There are also rather gruesome photos from Russia taken around the same time period. I have no record of his being in Russia, other than the photos, but there is much about the man I do not know. The location in Russia is not identified, only "Somewhere in Russia after World War I". This label had to be added later, since 'World War I" was called "The Great War", or "The War To End All Wars" until there was a World War II.

Those are important pictues Shap. They need to be preserved, gruesome or not.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:04 pm

Preserved, yes. But I'm not sure Facebook will allow them. I thought about putting them on photobucket and linking them here.

I will scan them and store them, in any case, as a precaution against the loss of the photos themselves. I would like to have them online, because I think people need to see them.

I'll re-read the Facebook policy and see if they are a violation. Maybe I can put them in a seperate album with a "Graphic nature" warning.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby jamiebk » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:35 pm

Shapley wrote:Preserved, yes. But I'm not sure Facebook will allow them. I thought about putting them on photobucket and linking them here.

I will scan them and store them, in any case, as a precaution against the loss of the photos themselves. I would like to have them online, because I think people need to see them.

I'll re-read the Facebook policy and see if they are a violation. Maybe I can put them in a seperate album with a "Graphic nature" warning.


Shap....I wasn't suggesting posting to Facebook...I agree with you... that might be objectionable according to their TOS.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 12:40 pm

jamiebk wrote:Shap....I wasn't suggesting posting to Facebook...I agree with you... that might be objectionable according to their TOS.


I think they need to be shared, but I don't want to do that in a shocking way. I'm not out to post them for their shock value. They are an important record of events, IMO, and ought to be shown, but they need to be done properly, and I'm not sure I know the proper venue for that.

I would hate for this record of man's inhumanity to be lost forever.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby jamiebk » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:32 pm

Shapley wrote:
jamiebk wrote:Shap....I wasn't suggesting posting to Facebook...I agree with you... that might be objectionable according to their TOS.


I think they need to be shared, but I don't want to do that in a shocking way. I'm not out to post them for their shock value. They are an important record of events, IMO, and ought to be shown, but they need to be done properly, and I'm not sure I know the proper venue for that.

I would hate for this record of man's inhumanity to be lost forever.

I think that you can password protect them on Photobucket. In other words, only those you invite could look at them.
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Re: Memorial Day

Postby Shapley » Fri Mar 05, 2010 2:39 pm

That would be an idea.
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