Higher Education

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Re: Higher Education

Postby Giant Communist Robot » Thu Feb 10, 2011 2:57 pm

jamiebk wrote:Unfortunately, the system as we know it is crumbling under its own weight. Costs are just sky-rocketing and the state has no money


This is so true. I could be wrong, but I think most of the budget for higher education was eliminated when Calif began it's lottery. After reading further I see that fees are being used to partially cover some salaries, which brings it closer in line with the definition for tuition.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby piqaboo » Thu Feb 10, 2011 4:18 pm

dai,
the UC system was set up to be a group of individually world-class research universities.
Several of them have maintained that with excellent undergraduate as well as the top notch graduate programs.

the Cal State system was set up primarily for undergraduate education tho you can get a fine graduate degree there too.
They also sneak in surprises, like having the national championship college baseball team several times.

The specialties vary by site. UC San Diego (of which Revelle is one campus among 6 now), specializes in biotech type stuff.

Because of residency requirements, tuition for the 'in state' student is ~ 1/3 that of someone coming from out-of-state.
That person can meet residency requirements, if they stay the year, but no going home for an extended summer vacation that first year.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Haggis@wk » Sat Feb 26, 2011 11:20 am

SEX ON CAMPUS, and the implications of female hypergamy.

“As just about everyone (from Dennis Prager to pickup artists) has figured out by now, women tend to want men of high status, men they look up to — literally, in terms of height, and figuratively, in terms of social standing, income, and education. If women systematically outpace men on these status markers — as they are beginning to — they will have to compete for men they deem suitable at a less-than-even ratio. There’s nothing we can do about this that I can think of, but it will not be good for marriage.”


Yeah, I had to look up "hypergamy" too.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Higher Education

Postby dai bread » Sat Feb 26, 2011 5:39 pm

The trophy wife is the classic case of hypergamy, but I've seen the reverse all too often. BTW, the BBB's spell-checker doesn't know "hypergamy" either. The number of good, competent women who take loser partners is amazing.

I've always thought the "trophy" was the husband, not the wife. The wife has scored a feather bed for a lifetime; the husband has scored a woman who will be pretty for only a few years. O.K., there are exceptions to that last, and I can think of some myself, but they are exceptions.
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Haggis@wk » Sun May 22, 2011 10:18 am

MALE EMPLOYMENT BY COLLEGE MAJOR:

“Leaving aside the salaries (not so surprising that engineering majors make more than education or humanities majors) it’s importantly to look pretty seriously at those light green bars. That represents people who went to college and are now employed in jobs that don’t require them to have gone to college. That’s 22 percent of employed people under age 25. They’re earning less than $16,000 a year on average. That’s depressing. Those are people who have jobs. There are a lot of college graduates out there who don’t have jobs and are not included in this chart.”


Image

Somewhat obvious bottom line: If you’re going to college to boost your career prospects, major in something that, you know, actually corresponds to some type of career.
The American Republic will endure until the day Congress discovers that it can bribe the public with the public’s money.” Alexis De Tocqueville 1835
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Re: Higher Education

Postby jamiebk » Mon May 23, 2011 10:04 pm

What the heck is "area studies"...
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Re: Higher Education

Postby piqaboo » Thu May 26, 2011 3:27 pm

Where the heck is biology-type studies?
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Thu May 26, 2011 4:16 pm

piqaboo wrote:Where the heck is biology-type studies?

Somewhere between "Health" and "Physical Sciences". Does that make you a cross-discipline?
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Re: Higher Education

Postby piqaboo » Fri May 27, 2011 1:19 pm

If there isnt discipline, I do get cross, so I suppose it does!
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Haggis@wk » Fri May 27, 2011 9:32 pm

COLLEGES — NOT AS BROKE AS CLAIMED?

Hearing that the University of California system had $2.5 billion in “unrestricted net assets” on hand in 2010 could make anyone question the necessity of the 32 percent tuition hike that has been proposed, or the 11 to 26 furlough days that more than 100,000 employees were forced to take in 2009.

Similar skepticism has been expressed in two other states in the last month, as different groups suggested that state universities were, in their view, hoarding funds while simultaneously demanding more money from students, denying pay increases to faculty and staff members, and fighting against cuts in state funding. In Michigan it was a faculty union in the middle of contract negotiations. In Ohio it was the state senate’s finance committee chairman. The problem with the claim, administrators say, is that unrestricted net assets are not just piles of cash lying around to be used for whatever they want. The accounting term, which they admit is confusing, refers to any money that doesn’t have some specific restriction placed on it by a donor. That includes a whole host of different funds, most of which have been designated for some purpose, they say.

The term could soon prove to be a headache for more state university administrators as lawmakers scour financial statements for any penny they can find to plug state budgets, and groups like students and faculty members are asked to share the sacrifice of budget cuts through tuition increases, cuts to services, pay freezes, and layoffs.
Read the whole thing. I think university financial statements will be scoured in ways they never have before, which could be awkward, but overall will probably be a good thing.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Schmeelkie » Tue May 31, 2011 9:09 am

I find this slightly frightening...I don't go to our library that much, but when I do, perusing the stacks often helps to find some good background material.

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The posting below by Kevin Kiley looks at the decision by the University of Denver to move most of its library collection off campus. It is from the April 27, 2011, issue of INSIDE HIGHER ED, an excellent - and free - online source for news, opinion and jobs for all of higher education. You can subscribe by going to: http://insidehighered.com/. Also for a free daily update from Inside Higher Ed, e-mail [scott.jaschik@insidehighered.com]. Copyright © 2011 Inside Higher Ed Reprinted with permission.

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No Room for Books

While university libraries have taken on numerous functions over the years, such as serving as places for students to study, meet with others, and interact with technology, one component that has always been central to their mission has been housing books.

But plans at the University of Denver to permanently move four-fifths of the Penrose Library’s holdings to an off-campus storage facility and renovate the building into an “Academic Commons,” with more seating, group space, and technological capacity, could make the university a flashpoint in the debate about whether the traditional function of storing books needs to happen on campus.

“We are not alone in this trend of increasing central campus space for study, services and student learning and decreasing central campus space for legacy collections,” said Nancy Allen, dean and director of Penrose Library, in an e-mail statement.

The proposed change has raised the ire of some arts, humanities, and social science professors who say that, while impressive, technology hasn’t yet replaced a good old-fashioned trip through the stacks. They argue that the administration dropped the changes in their laps without consulting them and that it will harm their main mode of research.

“You would never ask a scientist to get rid of his or her laboratory,” said Annabeth Headrick, an art history professor. “But that’s exactly what’s being done to us.”

The library's renovation, which is slated to cost $32 million and take 18 months, will radically transform the space to try to make it more welcoming for students to study or meet in. The project will also remove asbestos and open up the interior to more light.

During the renovation, the university plans to house the library’s 1.1 million books, as well as government documents, journals, microfiche, and CDs, in the Hampden Center, a 51,500-square-foot storage facility in southwest Denver, about 10 miles from campus.

Once the renovations are complete, the university will bring back some books and leave others at the storage facility. The original plans -- which did not cause alarm -- called for 80 percent of the materials to return to the renovated library, leaving behind seldom-accessed journals and those with digital replacements, government documents, and little-used books.

But the university announced to faculty members last week that the renovated library would now only hold 20 percent of its current collection, much to the surprise of professors.

In an e-mail, Allen said the books that will return to the library after renovation "will comprise a teaching collection carefully built with the input of faculty, especially those in the social sciences and humanities who depend in both teaching and research on monographs as the key form of scholarly communication." She said the rest of the collections would remain in the Hampden Center and be deliverable within two or three hours of a request.

A spokeswoman for the university said the chancellor and Board of Trustees made the decision to increase the percentage of stored material to allow for greater flexibility in the use of the library's space over time.

While many faculty members agree that the library needs to be renovated, they say administrators left them out of the process and that the provost presented the decision to them last week as a “done deal.”

“We should have been presented with the plan, asked to have a discussion and weigh in on our feelings about it before anything was finalized,” said Dean Saitta, chairman of the anthropology department and president of Denver's chapter of the American Association of University Professors.

Denver's spokeswoman said the university's administration consulted with the faculty in formal and informal ways throughout the process.

A similar plan at Syracuse University in 2009, in which low-use texts would have been housed in a facility 250 miles from campus, faced steep opposition from faculty members and students, who showed up in droves to protest the change. Suzanne E. Thorin, dean of the library at Syracuse, said the university now plans to build a new storage facility near campus, pending approval from the Board of Trustees in May.

The reaction by Denver faculty has been more muted, with fewer faculty members speaking up. Headrick said many faculty who wouldn’t be directly affected by the change have been reluctant to support those who would.

Faculty members who have objected say that, while database research is important to modern-day academics, Denver researchers will invariably lose out on serendipitous discovery that comes with perusing a library’s stacks. “I know it’s kind of a touchy-feely argument, and I wish I had documented my own experience to prove it,” Headrick said. “But it’s very, very common in a lot of the social sciences. I’ll leave with five other books that I find while looking.”

The library is slated to be finished by December 2012. Allen said the university will continually monitor the use of books to determine which should remain on campus and which should be sent to the storage facility.

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Re: Higher Education

Postby Shapley » Tue May 31, 2011 9:49 am

Printed books, it seems, are becoming quaint relics of the past - like adding machines, party-line telephones, and Cathode Ray Tubes.

Computers, smart phones, the Kindle and the Nook and the iBook (or whatever it's called), with their instant search features, cut-and-paste technology, and portability have moved college research away from the stacks of books into a hand-held device that permits term papers to be written in your dorm room, in the local coffee house, or even at the park.

The Image of Hermione Grainger sitting the library surrounded by stack of dusty volumes has become as much a part of the fantasy world as the flying brooms and magic wands of the rest of that series.

I like books, and I'd rather have a book in my hand than an electronic device. Most college students, however, don't seem to feel that way.
Last edited by Shapley on Tue May 31, 2011 3:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Tue May 31, 2011 12:07 pm

Shapley wrote:... instant search features, cut-and-paste technology, and portability have moved college research away from the stacks of books into a hand-held device that permits term papers to be written in your dorm room, in the local coffee house, or even at the park.... an electronic devise. Most college student's, however, don't seem to feel that way.

And a darn good thing it is, too! I remember paperbased library research for the basic term paper. Yecch. And without a convenient photocopier, even - notes were taken by hand.

Shapley wrote:... an electronic devise...
The electronic device (n) would let you devise (v) a clearer expression of your thought process.

Shapley wrote:.. Most college student's...
And you could check for the diffence between the plural and the possessive form of the noun "student".

Let's all hear a big "OORAH!!" for the red squiggly spellchecker and the green squiggly grammarchecker underlines in Word!
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Schmeelkie » Tue May 31, 2011 12:10 pm

Here's an option for bypassing college:
Tech mogul pays bright minds not to go to college
Not a bad idea IMHO. I'd call it a sucess if 1 of the 20 is sucessful right away. Likely this will lead to good things for others, but will likely take much longer (10-20 years I'd guess).
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Re: Higher Education

Postby piqaboo » Tue May 31, 2011 3:10 pm

some idiot interviewer accused him of cherry-picking the awardees.
He answered with a cheery "well, yeah, of course!", and managed to avoid a snide "doh!". I was impressed!

I think its a very worthwhile idea, especially as its privately funded.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Shapley » Tue May 31, 2011 3:31 pm

Selma in Sandy Eggo wrote:Let's all hear a big "OORAH!!" for the red squiggly spellchecker and the green squiggly grammarchecker underlines in Word!


And let's hear it for the 'edit' button, that permits me to correct such things...
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Giant Communist Robot » Tue May 31, 2011 4:32 pm

I struggle to express myself well, and with punctuation. I admire other's ability to turn out good sentences.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Shapley » Tue May 31, 2011 4:43 pm

Giant Communist Robot wrote:I struggle to express myself well, and with punctuation. I admire other's ability to turn out good sentences.


Sometimes, my mistakes are from lack of knowing. More often, they are due to poor typing skills. For example, I used the wod 'device' correctly in the post in which I later spelled it 'devise'.

Apostrophe's give me fits. I sometimes put them where they don't belong, othertimes I forget to put them where they do. Like everything else, my clumsy fingers often put them afore the letter I tried to place them abaft.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Schmeelkie » Wed Jun 01, 2011 12:14 pm

Shapley wrote:I like books, and I'd rather have a book in my hand than an electronic device. Most college students, however, don't seem to feel that way.


but the college library isn't just for the students - the faculty can use it as much if not more than the students. Below, my husband's response to this:
Appalling idea. I hate, hate, hate this. Earlier this year I went to the stacks to get a particular book. Near it in the stacks I found five others that were relevant. Removing this serendipity is a horrible idea.
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Re: Higher Education

Postby Shapley » Wed Jun 01, 2011 2:33 pm

I had the same idea concerning Barnes & Noble's idea of reducing their CD selection. From one standpoint, it makes sense. They cannot afford to maintain the stock that they can offer online. They may carry five different versions of Mahler's 2nd, and the few customers looking for it will be searching for the one they dont' carry. Online ordering permits them to carry as many as are available from suppliers, since they can ship direct from the factory, if needed, and don't have to maintain the stock. It is not financially viable to do otherwise.

However, for browsing, I find there is nothing like strolling through the classical music section, finding CD's by composers of whom I'd never heard before. I have not mastered that online. The same is true of books (which, thankfully, Barnes & Noble still carries aplenty). Online browsing, at least with my limited skills, requires me to have some idea of the particular topic for which I'm searching. In the bookstore, one might go looking at sailing books and stumble upon an interest book on Chinese cooking. Online does not strike me as so appealing.

I assume the warehousing of library books will have a similar impact for those who browse there. My comments regarded research, where the topic and, frequently, the volume sought is more easily located online.
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