Projects

If you would like to post a topic on the Beethoven Bulletin Board but you cannot find an appropriate location... post it here!

Moderator: Nicole Marie

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Wed Dec 07, 2005 11:09 pm

Originally posted by piqaboo:
"more than one way to re-skin a cat shelf!"
Selma, LOL!
Before I posted this message, you and I both had 3425 messages to our credit.

Defensive PW Post
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby OperaTenor » Thu Dec 08, 2005 12:17 am

Originally posted by barfle:

Defensive PW Post
HAH!

:p
"To help mend the world is true religion."
- William Penn

http://www.one.org
OperaTenor
Patron
 
Posts: 10457
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Paradise with Piq & Altoid, southern California

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Sun Dec 11, 2005 7:14 pm

Well, I have a few pictures of some of those project elements I mentioned earlier.

Here's the rather fancy baseboard with trim edging in the laundry room. The edge work is the "picture frame" idea I had for finishing off an outside edge. The full length of the tiles is 12".

Image

Here's a picture of one of the sconces in the dining room. The center medallion area is just 4" in diameter. The bulbs are normal size, but flame-shaped. You can also see the turn-switch at the bottom.

Image

I believe the turquoise detail was added by someone else, because it's clearly hand painted.
Last edited by barfle on Wed Aug 09, 2006 1:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Sat Dec 31, 2005 9:05 am

I worked on another project in the house during the past year. This one was a bit more than the cat shelf, but nowhere near as involved as the laundry room.

When we moved into the house, there was a pantry cupboard in the kitchen that was, shall we say, a bit on the mediocre side. Actually, all the cabinets were just what the developer put in - generally acceptable but nothing to write up in a message board.

The pantry is a floor-to-ceiling cabinet, a little less than two feet wide. It was divided into two sections, an upper one and a lower one. The shelves were "adjustable" with those plastic supports that fit into holes in the side of the cabinet. They were made of particle board, sometime before 1980, because that's when the house was built. Needless to say, they sagged and didn't inspire a lot of confidence. Also, stuff in the back was hard to get to. To add to the level of dissatisfaction of the cupboard, the shelf that divided the top and bottom had a large arc cut in the left side, rendering its support on that side to no more than an inch or so in the front and back. Again, lots of sag and very little confidence. Sorry, but I have no "before" pictures of this mess.

We went to a home and garden show in the area, and my wife found a guy who made slide-out shelves for existing cabinets. She brought me to his booth, and we were both pleased with his ideas and his workmanship. She got a ballpark figure from him of something like $1500 to do our kitchen, so we had him come out and do an official bid. Well, that was not even in the same county of the ballpark, so we kind of left that idea to blow in the wind.

Some time later, we were in Ikea and my wife found a system of wire shelf/baskets that mounted on slides so you could pull them out. She felt this would be a good solution to our mediocre pantry, and I agreed it certainly was worth a shot. Of course, nothing is that easy.

We had to go back home and measure the cabinets - the shelves had to go through the opening of the door. Naturally, Ikea measures everything in metric, and our cabinets are English, so, while we were able to find a shelf that would go through the opening, there was a LOT of building out to do in the cabinet walls. I was at a loss to see how this was going to be anything anyone would consider looking good, even for the inside of a pantry cabinet.

I did some measuring, and figured that a tubafor on each side, plus a masonite panel, would build out the sides just about right. My wife said she thought peg board would be a better idea than the simple masonite sides, and while I'm not much of a fan of pegboard, I could see some advantages in using it in such a space.

The rollers for the shelves mount with three screws each, so I positioned the tubafors so the screws would mount into them. I mounted the tubafors to the sides of the cabinet with glue and deck screws. Here's a note of caution: the threads on deck screws are so strong, they will pull the head down into the wood, driving the point further than you want it to go. I broke through the side of the cabinet in several places. Those cabinets are made of some kind of composite, since the breakouts (yes, plural) are not what you would expect of a wood or even a plywood panel. Fortunately, our goal with these cabinets is to eventually paint them, and this cupboard is beside the refrigerator, so my sins are not all that obvious, and when we get around to doing real work in the kitchen, the breakouts will get filled and painted, so it's not a fatal flaw.

I replaced the dividing shelf with a piece of MDF. For something that sagged as much as that piece did, it could have held my weight, since it took quite an effort to bust it up to get it out of the cabinet.

Once the tubafors were in place on the bottom, I was pretty careful about how aligned the holes in the pegboard, since I wanted to use that 1" spacing to align the slides for the shelves. I took two pieces of the pegboard, clamped them face to face, and sawed them both at the same time. Seemed to work just fine.

I mounted the pegboard to the tubafors with glue and finish nails, making sure the nails would not be in a spot where the mounting screws for the slides might be. Pretty much, that meant between the horizontal lines of the holes.

I mounted the dividing shelf in the groove on the front of the dividing span between the top and bottom, set the sides on top of the tubafors, and ran a cleat to hold the back. Then I did the tubafor and pegboard idea in the top part.

The top part has an area where our HVAC ductwork makes a zig between the first and second floors, which limits how far up the slides can go, so I stopped there. A bit of miter sawing was all that was required there.

Then, I had to drill for the mounting screws for the slides. I have a portable jig for drilling bookshelves every inch, and I set that up to let me drill about 8 holes at a time, the full length of the tubafors. The horizontal spacing of the screws did not line up with the pegboard holes, being metric measurements.

I added some trim pieces to the front edges of the tubafor-pegboard assembly to make it look like it wasn't just slapped together.

Then, my wife painted the insides white, I mounted the slides (a few shims were requred, but not all that many), put the drawers in, and loaded it up.

My wife is very happy about the results, and with the refrigerator covering up the deck screw breakouts, she's not even worried about that.

Image

Image
Last edited by barfle on Wed Aug 09, 2006 1:10 pm, edited 1 time in total.
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Sat Dec 31, 2005 7:34 pm

Wow! barfle, you belong in the Practical Handyman Hall of Fame. That is now a spectacularly useful pantry cupboard!

:envy:
>^..^<
Selma in Sandy Eggo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6273
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2002 1:01 am
Location: San Diego

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Sun Jan 01, 2006 8:41 pm

Well, I do thank you, ma'am. Unfortunately, there are a few blemishes to repair on the outside of the cupboard, so "hall of fame" material I ain't just yet.

And, you might note, my dear wife came up with most of the ideas for the job. I just provided the muscle and engineering.

And the laundry room has now entered its THIRD YEAR of projecthood. :eek:
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby BigJon@Work » Tue Jan 03, 2006 1:15 pm

I see she's already using the slides as storage. :D
"I am a 12 foot lizard." GCR Jan 31, 2006
BigJon@Work
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 2252
Joined: Tue May 03, 2005 12:01 am
Location: work. Duh!

Re: Projects

Postby piqaboo » Tue Jan 03, 2006 1:39 pm

Barfle, way cool! I want sliders for our pots/pans shelves. Its a low priority want tho.

Our next project: bring the clothesline inside, and hang it in the garage where it wont drip on the m/c. Not nearly as easy as it should be!
Altoid - curiously strong.
piqaboo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 7135
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2003 12:01 am
Location: Paradise (So. Cal.)

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Tue Jan 03, 2006 1:54 pm

Originally posted by BigJon@Work:
I see she's already using the slides as storage. :D
For the past six months!

Originally posted by piqabu:
I want sliders for our pots/pans shelves. Its a low priority want tho.
I don't remember the total cost of this project, but I don't figure it was any more than $250, most of that going into the shelves from Ikea. And I'm pretty sure you have Ikeas in paradise.

Originally posted by piq:
bring the clothesline inside, and hang it in the garage where it wont drip on the m/c.
The motorcycle has to stay outside? Wow, have you got OT wrapped around your little finger!

<small>[ 01-03-2006, 01:58 PM: Message edited by: barfle ]</small>
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Tue Jan 03, 2006 3:12 pm

We have an Ikea, and it's a popular place. I think the twice-a-year-sale is still going on. :D
>^..^<
Selma in Sandy Eggo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6273
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2002 1:01 am
Location: San Diego

Re: Projects

Postby treebeau » Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:20 am

My current project. Installing plumbing for an air compressor in my wood shop.
Link to "plumbing shop for air."

Regards,
Tim B.
treebeau
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 2133
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2000 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC, USA

Re: Projects

Postby barfle » Wed Jan 04, 2006 7:55 am

Tim, what kind of compressor are you going to use for the system? I just have a little portable Sears compressor that seems to be adequate for filling tires and blowing dust. I don't have any air tools, so that's not an issue.
--I know what I like--
barfle
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6144
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Springfield, Vahjinyah, USA

Re: Projects

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Wed Jan 04, 2006 11:44 am

Air tools rock. Lighter than electric for equal or better torque. Easier to control, too. Also safe when the rain blows in under the garage door and you're standing on a damp spot. The highspeed motors are noisy, though, and I like gloves, because the motors get cold.

The tools work better and last longer if you put a moisture trap just upstream of the bench fitting(s). Some of the traps also add some oil mist into the air, though I don't know if those are generally available or if they're a Navy special. The Navy will buy an artisan nearly anything, as long as it can be justified as a corrosion-prevention measure.

Your copper plumbing looks really nice. Good job.
>^..^<
Selma in Sandy Eggo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6273
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2002 1:01 am
Location: San Diego

Re: Projects

Postby piqaboo » Wed Jan 04, 2006 12:49 pm

Air tools is mighty fine indeed. Dont got none, tho.

No, m/c is inside. Garage clothes line must not drip on it. Ikea, yes. Time, no. Specially if it required the kind of snazzy jury-rigging you had to do for installation.

One project is recently completed, due to intervention of crafty aunt. I'd taken a chair from my dad's house years ago, to re-upholster. (the fabric was shredding)as a gift. I got 80% done and ran out of time. Pregnancy, baby etc, along with a certain degree of procrastination. At Xmas, Aunt took chair, supplies, and dad's other chair as a template. "My" project is now done, and she's half way thru the other chair to boot. Dad is happy, aunt is happy and OT is happy 'cause that freed up a LOT of garage space!
Aunt also very busy, because those chairs needed to be taken down to bare wooden frame and rebuilt from there up.
Altoid - curiously strong.
piqaboo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 7135
Joined: Sat Aug 09, 2003 12:01 am
Location: Paradise (So. Cal.)

Re: Projects

Postby treebeau » Wed Jan 04, 2006 2:58 pm

Originally posted by Selma in Sandy Eggo:
Your copper plumbing looks really nice. Good job.
Thanks! Today I went home during lunch and cut all the horizontal 3/4 inch parts. That was a little bit of a chore because I wanted every important thing to end up in the center of a wall stud. You'll see when it's all installed.

Barfle,
My new compressor is a Coleman, 27 gallon, 5.5 HP model. I can dial in a desired pressure. The piece of crap one I am replacing had a fixed max pressure of 90 PSI and was in "hot dog" configuration, meaning it took up more floor space. It works just fine and I am just going to put it out on the street with a "FREE" sign on it.

Right now I only have a brad nailer, tire filler, and air nozzle for blowing out sawdust. Not sure what to add next, but now I have the capability.

Regards,
Tim B.
treebeau
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 2133
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2000 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC, USA

Re: Projects

Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Wed Jan 04, 2006 3:38 pm

Originally posted by treebeau:
Not sure what to add next, but now I have the capability.
Drill motor. Highspeed motor (I'm used to a brand called Dotco) which acts like a Dremel, but actually has power. It accepts all those fine, tiny little detail tools on arbor stems.

You might consider leaving pneumatic tool catalogs around the house, with sticky notes on the pages that interest you. There are birthdays, holidays, anniversaries of various events.
>^..^<
Selma in Sandy Eggo
1st Chair
 
Posts: 6273
Joined: Thu Dec 12, 2002 1:01 am
Location: San Diego

Re: Projects

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Jan 04, 2006 6:23 pm

Dotco's okay, but Ingersoll-Rand is the best. This, from someone who spent his shore duty rotation working in a Navy portable power tool shop.

[digression] Ooh, talk about unexpected treasures! In said shop we also were the place old tools came to die if they were no longer repairable. One such piece was an old Milwaukee pneumatic drill we could no longer get repair parts for. The chief said chuck it, but me being the eternal packrat, decided to give it a chance at a second life and improvised some replacement vanes for the motor(that was all it was really lacking, besides needing a good cleaning and oiling). It seemed to work fine, and since it had been banished to the garbage bin, I took it home. I've lost track of it(I think it was left with the first wife - like she would ever have a use for it!), and have since learned it was most likely an original first model from the 1920's. :( [/digression]

Be sure and steer clear of the Asian-made garbage.
"To help mend the world is true religion."
- William Penn

http://www.one.org
OperaTenor
Patron
 
Posts: 10457
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Paradise with Piq & Altoid, southern California

Re: Projects

Postby treebeau » Wed Jan 04, 2006 10:03 pm

Great progress today.
Almost done !!!
Link to part 2 of air plumbing

I can't work on it until Friday evening, or maybe Saturday morning if I can find me a date. :)

Regards,
Tim B.
treebeau
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 2133
Joined: Wed Oct 25, 2000 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC, USA

Re: Projects

Postby dai bread » Wed Jan 04, 2006 11:51 pm

Odd how you guys go for air power. Home handyman stuff here is all electric. If you want air power, you're talking serious industrial gear in commercial workshops.
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
dai bread
1st Chair
 
Posts: 3020
Joined: Fri Nov 29, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Cambridge, New Zealand

Re: Projects

Postby OperaTenor » Thu Jan 05, 2006 12:07 am

I think it's a testosterone thing.........
"To help mend the world is true religion."
- William Penn

http://www.one.org
OperaTenor
Patron
 
Posts: 10457
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Paradise with Piq & Altoid, southern California

PreviousNext

Return to Culture Connections

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users

cron