Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby JasonK » Fri Feb 16, 2001 4:48 pm

It was a legitmate guess....perhaps not the right answer, but legitmate....<P><BR>
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby Nicole Marie » Mon Feb 19, 2001 1:29 pm

I must say I do not know the story of the Moonlight Sonata! And it looks like no one does either. Go ahead and post it. I'm very interested to know!
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby Nicole Marie » Mon Feb 19, 2001 1:31 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by The Riddler:<BR><B>I am currently working as an "Annoyance Technician". My current projects include:<BR>-My Parents<BR>-Nicole Marie<BR>-Visiting Hockey Teams to Nashville<BR>Past successful projects include:<BR>-Ex Girlfriends<BR>-Professors<BR>-Other radio DJs<P>It is a full time job that takes the energy out of you. Nicole Marie is one of my toughest "clients". She's a pistol. Very bright too. Image</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Thanks Riddler! Nice to see I'm number 2 on your list. Remind me to lock my doors at night! Image<P>
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby EJA_2 » Mon Feb 19, 2001 2:00 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Nicole Marie:<BR><B>I must say I do not know the story of the Moonlight Sonata! And it looks like no one does either. Go ahead and post it. I'm very interested to know!</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Alright, here it is. I plagiarized this from a very well-known, extremely aged, and prodigously prolific writer named Author Unknown. My respects to him. As far as I can tell he must have at least three millenia under his belt, so if he is fabricating herein, I have no way of confirming or denying it, particularly as this work is not dated, and may have been written at any time. <P> <BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><BR>Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata<BR>Author Unknown<P> It happened at Bonn. One moonlight winter's evening I called upon Beethoven, for I wanted him to take a walk, and afterward sup with me. In passing through some dark, narrow street he paused suddenly. "Hush!" he said -- "What sound is that? It is from my sonata in F!" he said. "Hark! how well it is played!" <BR> It was a little mean, dwelling, and we paused outside and listened. The player went on; but in the midst of the finale there was a sudden break, then the voice of sobbing. "I can not play any more. It is so beautiful, it is utterly beyond my power to do it justice. Oh, what would I not give to go to the concert at Cologne!" <BR> "Ah, my sister," said her companion, "why create regrets when there is no remedy? We can scarcely pay our rent." <BR> "You are right; and yet I wish for once in my life to hear some really good music. But is of no use."<BR> Beethoven looked at me. "Let us go in," he said.<BR> "Go in!" I exclaimed. "What can we go in for?"<BR> "I will play to her," he said, in an excited tone. "Here is feeling -- genius -- understanding. I will play to her, and she will understand it." And, before I could prevent him, his hand was upon the door. <BR> A pale young man was sitting by the table, making shoes; and near him, leaning sorrowfully upon an old-fashioned harpsichord, sat a young, with a profusion of light hair falling over her bent face. Both were cleanly but very poorly dressed, and both started and turned toward us as we entered. <BR> "Pardon me," said Beethoven, "but I heard music, and was tempted to enter. I am a musician."<BR> The girl blushed and the young man looked grave -- somewhat annoyed. <BR> "I -- I also overhead something of what you said," continued my friend. "You wish to hear -- that is, you would like -- that is -- shall I play for you?"<BR> There was something so odd in the whole affair, and something so comic and pleasant in the manner of the speaker that the spell was broken in a moment, and all smiled involuntarily. <BR> "Thank!" said the shoemaker; "but our harpsichord is so wretched, and we have no music." <BR> "No music!" echoed my friend. "How then does the "Fraulein --"<BR> He paused and colored up, for the girl looked full at him, and he saw that she was blind.<BR> "I -- I entreat your pardon!" he stammered. "But I had not perceived before. Then you play by ear?" <BR> "Entirely."<BR> "And where do you hear the music, since you frequent no concerts?"<BR> "I used to hear a lady practicing near us, when we lived at Bruhl two years. During the summer evenings her windows were generally open, and I walked to and fro outside to listen to her."<BR> She seemed shy; so Beethoven said no more, but seated himself quietly before the piano, and began to play. He had no sooner struck the first chord than I knew what would follow -- how grand he would be that night. And I was not mistaken. Never, during all the years I knew him, did I hear him play as he then played to that blind girl and her brother. He was inspired; and from the instant when his fingers began to wander along the keys, the very tone of the instrument began to grow sweeter and more equal. <BR> The brother and sister were silent with wonder and rapture. The former laid aside his work; the latter, with her head bent slightly forward, and her hands pressed tightly over her breast, crouched down near the end of the harpsichord, as if fearful lest even the beating of her heart should break the flow of those magical, sweet sounds. It was as if we were all bound in a strange dream, and only feared to wake. <BR> Suddenly, the flame of the single candle waivered, sank, flickered, and went out. Beethoven paused and threw open the shutters, admitting a flood of brilliant moonlight. The room was almost as light as before, and the illumination fell strongly on the piano and player. But the chain of ideas seemed to have been broken by the accident. His head dropped upon his breast; his hands rested upon his knees; he seemed absorbed in meditation. It was thus for some time. <BR> At length the young shoemaker rose, and approached him eagerly, yet reverently. "Wonderful man!" he said, in a low and tone, "who are you?"<BR> The composer smiled as he only could smile, benevolently, indulgently, kingly. "Listen!" he said, and he played the opening bars of the sonata in F. <BR> A cry of delight and recognition burst from them both, and exclaiming, "Then you are Beethoven!" they covered his hands with tears and kisses. <BR> He rose to go, but we held him back with entreaties.<BR> "Play to us once more -- only once more!"<BR> He suffered himself to be led back to the instrument. The moon shone brightly in through the window and lit up his glorious, rugged head and massive figure. "I will improvise a sonatato to the moonlight!" he said, looking up thoughtfully to the sky and stars. Then his hands dropped on the keys and he began to play a sad and infinitely lovely movement, which crept gently over the instrument like the calm flow of moonlight over the dark earth.<BR> This was followed by a wild, elfin passage in triple time -- a sort of grotesque interlude, like the dance of sprites upon the sward. Then came a swift agitato finale -- a breathless, hurrying, trembling movement, descriptive of flight and uncertainty, and vague, impulsive terror, which carried us away on its rustling wings, and left us all in emotion and wonder. <BR> "Farewell to you!" said Beethoven pushing back his chair and turning toward the door -- "farewell to you!"<BR> "You will come again?" asked they, in one breath. <BR> He paused, and looked compassionately, almost tenderly, at the face of the blind girl. "Yes, yes," he said, hurriedly, "I will come again, and give the Fraulein some lessons. Farewell! I will soon come again!" <BR> They followed us in silence more eloquent than words, and stood at their door till we were out of sight and hearing.<BR> "Let us make haste back," said Beethoven, "that I may write out that sonata while I can yet remember it." <BR> We did so, and he sat over it till long past day-dawn. And this was the origin of that moonlight sonata with which we are all so fondly acquainted.<HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Sorry about the length. I couldn't bear to abridge. If this indeed factual, which I have no particular reason to doubt, it provides a wealth of insights into the personality and genius of Beethoven. <BR>Yes, I did have to go back to my text books for this one; I don't have that kind of memory!<P> -- Ethan Adams<p>[This message has been edited by EJA (edited 02-19-2001).]
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby shostakovich » Mon Feb 19, 2001 3:36 pm

Hi Ethan. I admire your diligence in writing the whole story for us. I'm glad you did it, and I enjoyed reading it. When a story seems too good to be true, it probably is (too good to be true). This one definitely has the ring of fiction.<P>The mere fact that a person wanted do dine with Beethoven (without some ulterior motive) is already suspect. The blind girl in question could not afford to go to concerts. How did she come to know the sonata by ear? The harpsichord was out of vogue in Mozart's time. Beethoven's muscular music needs the piano. He would not have suffered hearing, let alone playing, his sonatas on a harpsichord. Speaking of hearing, that was already starting to go in 1801, when the "Moonlight" was written. The work is dedicated to Giulietta Guicciardi, who was one of the "Immortal Beloved" candidates. The "Immortal Beloved" letter was written around that time. I think he wanted to marry Giulietta, but they were of different social classes.<P> "Moonlight" was given to the work by a critic named Rellstab, in whom visions of moonlight over Lake Lucerne were invoked. This comes from a book on Beethoven by John N. Burk, who adds "Beethoven is reported to have had no special fondness for this Sonata, partly perhaps because it eclipsed others in the public attention".<BR>Party Pooper.
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby shostakovich » Mon Feb 19, 2001 3:56 pm

Hi again, Ethan. I just re-read Unknown Author's story. The practicing lady in Bruhl explains one of my concerns, but I missed a BIGGIE. Neither Beethoven, nor anyone else, could have IMPROVISED that sonata. <BR>Shos
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby EJA_2 » Mon Feb 19, 2001 5:45 pm

Shos,<BR> I expect you are quite right on all counts. First of all, the whole story is quite in opposition to the biographical information I have read concerning Beethoven -- not that biographers are all that accurate, but I very much doubt that Beethoven would drop in on someone as this story claims. In addition, as you say, there is no doubt that the sonata was not improvised impromptu as Beethoven sat before a decrepid harpsichord. Perhaps the basic ideas came to him, but not the entire sonata in its full form, or probably even a resemblance thereof. I also kind of wonder if anyone can tell me whether the fanciful description of the Sonata bears any resmblance to the sonata itself? I kind of fail to see it myself. Furthermore, the florid language employed by the author throughout the account is not frequently associated in literature with a truthful and honest account. Yes, I am afraid we must lay this sweet story to rest in the vault of fiction. Still, it is interesting -- a good conversation piece I thought, not unlike a counterfeit masterpiece from the visual arts. <BR> Now tell me, I've not heard of this "Immortal Beloved" business. What's it all about? I never heard of Beethoven having any involvement with a woman. <P> -- Ethan Adams<BR><p>[This message has been edited by EJA (edited 02-19-2001).]
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby shostakovich » Tue Feb 20, 2001 3:58 pm

Hi Ethan. The "Immortal Beloved" letter was written by Beethoven the same year as the "Moonlight". It was not addressed to anyone in particular, leading to much speculation when it was discovered. The movie, Immortal Beloved, is about discovering who that was. I've forgotten the movie's conclusion, but there's enough questionable stuff in it to say the movie's guess is as good as anyone else's, and no more than that. The movie does a very good job of capturing the period, and the score (as you might suspect) is wonderful. I think some web sites have the letter if you want to search for it. If you find it, read it with another possible candidate in mind: his dead mother. It's just an idea. Good luck.<BR>Shos
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby Peter » Sat Feb 24, 2001 11:28 am

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by EJA:<BR><B>Shos,<BR> I expect you are quite right on all counts. First of all, the whole story is quite in opposition to the biographical information I have read concerning Beethoven -- not that biographers are all that accurate, but I very much doubt that Beethoven would drop in on someone as this story claims. In addition, as you say, there is no doubt that the sonata was not improvised impromptu as Beethoven sat before a decrepid harpsichord. Perhaps the basic ideas came to him, but not the entire sonata in its full form, or probably even a resemblance thereof. I also kind of wonder if anyone can tell me whether the fanciful description of the Sonata bears any resmblance to the sonata itself? I kind of fail to see it myself. Furthermore, the florid language employed by the author throughout the account is not frequently associated in literature with a truthful and honest account. Yes, I am afraid we must lay this sweet story to rest in the vault of fiction. Still, it is interesting -- a good conversation piece I thought, not unlike a counterfeit masterpiece from the visual arts. <BR> Now tell me, I've not heard of this "Immortal Beloved" business. What's it all about? I never heard of Beethoven having any involvement with a woman. <BR> -- Ethan Adams<BR>[This message has been edited by EJA (edited 02-19-2001).]</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Other holes in the story include the fact that the epithet "Moonlight" was only first applied after Beethoven`s death, & even then, it was only intended to describe the opening adagio. The thunderous presto finale certainly blows away any dreamy notions of moonlight! Also, the sonata`s key is C sharp minor, not F as in the story. When the composer offered up the work, along with its sister piece, op.27 no.1, for publication, he applied his own title for each: Quasi una Fantasia (almost a fantasy). Still, the story does make for a lovely read!
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby Peter » Sat Feb 24, 2001 12:00 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by shostakovich:<BR><B>Hi Ethan. The "Immortal Beloved" letter was written by Beethoven the same year as the "Moonlight". It was not addressed to anyone in particular, leading to much speculation when it was discovered. The movie, Immortal Beloved, is about discovering who that was. I've forgotten the movie's conclusion, but there's enough questionable stuff in it to say the movie's guess is as good as anyone else's, and no more than that. The movie does a very good job of capturing the period, and the score (as you might suspect) is wonderful. I think some web sites have the letter if you want to search for it. If you find it, read it with another possible candidate in mind: his dead mother. It's just an idea. Good luck.<BR>Shos</B><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Hello Shos, EJA, all.<P>Shos, I am intrigued by your Beethoven`s mother theory as an Immortal Beloved nomination; not since your questioning the authenticity of Schubert`s Unfinished have you thrown me so! The movie of the same name concluded that the mystery woman was Johanna, the composer`s sister-in-law. This is complete claptrap, as there is no evidence whatsoever to back up this assertion. The merits, or demerits of the movie have split opinion down the middle on another Beethoven discussion forum. You are right when you say that it looks good & has a great score (how could it not?), but just as Amadeus is flawed in its telling of the Mozart story, so too is Immortal Beloved. It looks to me like it was aimed primarily at women, with its brooding hero, garish costumes (which are not out of place) & carefully selected musical items, a la His Greatest Hits; I have heard the movie described as a "chick flick". With its mixed European cast, it is at various times confusing, historically flawed &, as I`ve said, ludicrously concluded. To top it all, Gary Oldman (Beethoven) did no research for his role, & admits that this composer does nothing for him! Well.........!
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Re: Stump Nicole Marie (Quiz II)

Postby shostakovich » Sat Feb 24, 2001 7:08 pm

Glad to have you back, Peter. You were missed.<BR>Shos
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