Looking for OT

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Re: Looking for OT

Postby treebeau » Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:01 am

Doesn't look like a REAL airport!
Only one (little) person visible.
Where are all the sleeping foreigners? Hare Krishnas handing out flowers? Airport security personnel?

Regards,
Tim :) B.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:25 am

Hi, sorry for the fitful start. I meant to post the limit of photos last night, but my pic of Blackbourne cathedral kept coming up sideways, and it was too late at night for problem solving capacity for me. I ended up renaming the file, and now it comes up right - go figure.

Any how, our first venue was Blackbourne cathedral:

:D

Our next stop was Durham. We got to spend a couple of days there, and it was well worth it. The cathedral is a magnificent example of Norman architecture, and the finest accoustics of any large cathedral I've ever sung in. While singing, I could hear myself and those around me, yet there didn't seem to be an excess of reverberation. We were told by listeners we could be heard clearly everywhere in the cathedral as well. I have a theory for those wonderful accoustics: The church has an area that's called the Chapel of the Nine Alters in the apse. It is lower than the main floor of the rest of the cathedral by ~4 ft, while having the same ceiling height, and is somewhat screened off from the rest of the church by the stone high altar screen and partitions on each side of the quire. I think what would normally carry around the church in the form of reverb gets caught in that chapel, keeping the rest of the church relatively echo-free.
The cathedral was marvelous, had a wonderful cemetary for me to look at all the old dead people, and Old Durham was a great place to wander:

The cathedral:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/durhamcath.jpg" alt=" - " />

The river Weir:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/durhamriver1.jpg" alt=" - " />

What appears to be a 13th century grave:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/grave.jpg" alt=" - " />

One of the lanes near the cathedral:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/lane.jpg" alt=" - " />

The Weir again, with the cathedral above:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/durhamriver2.jpg" alt=" - " />

<small>[ 08-10-2005, 11:56 AM: Message edited by: OperaTenor ]</small>
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 10:51 am

A couple more photos before we leave Durham.

Here's Piq, Altoid, Piq's mom, and a good friend in the square in front of the cathedral:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/durfam.jpg" alt=" - " />

We took a tour of Durham castle, another splendid example of midiaeval architecture:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/dcastle1.jpg" alt=" - " />

This is where I also started compiling my addendum to Haggis' collection of English doors:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/dc8.jpg" alt=" - " />

In our wanderings in Old Durham, I noticed this shop window, and was amazed at how sagging over time had bent the frame:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/window.jpg" alt=" - " />

One more look at the cathedral before we go:
<img src="http://www.operatenor.100megs24.com/durhamcath2.jpg" alt=" - " />

Next: To Harrogate, where we are based to go to Ripon and York!

<small>[ 08-10-2005, 11:58 AM: Message edited by: OperaTenor ]</small>
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Marye » Wed Aug 10, 2005 12:06 pm

Excellent OT...
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby piqaboo » Wed Aug 10, 2005 1:34 pm

Blackburn probably would get more enthusiasm if we'd all been less tired. John Bertalot, who taught the master class, managed to keep us alert and functional for 90 minutes of the 2 hour class, on a hot afternoon, when none of us had slept for at least 36 hours. He was good and funny. We broke the "house rules" and brought water bottles into the choir stalls. As the guy in charge later noted, 9 year old boys can get thru a rehearsal without water, so please not to bring water bottles in the future.

The cathedral staff prepared and served us lunch on Sunday, in between the two services. They have set up the crypt as a restaurant and gathering area. It was a very nice thing to do, and I very much enjoyed the boiled new potatoes, ham in parsley sauce and salad. I'd never had parsley sauce before - yum! I cant remember what they served for dessert, but I remember I enjoyed it a lot! This was another place safe for the Altoid to run amok, with all those watchful eyes to keep her safe, and very little that she could damage.

The crypt at this cathedral was very well lit, as it had numerous ground level windows. I liked those folks and that place. Shame there is nothing to do or see there beside the cathedral. On Sunday, while OT & I had two rehearsals and sang in two services, Grandma and Altoid did multiple laps both on foot and in "pushchair" around the cathedral, for 8 hours, breaking only to join us for 2 hours at lunch. Grandma deserves mucho kudos!
Altoid - curiously strong.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby piqaboo » Wed Aug 10, 2005 2:02 pm

The castle in Durham had some interesting structural points.... There is a Norman upper gallery, which houses the college student council (their dorm rooms). This gallery sags outward, with visibly bowed and leaning walls and ceiling. Acc one guide (not ours), the college poured a lot of concrete into the foundation recently, to prevent the wall from toppling over completely.

Fascinating to imagine living in a 900+ year old building.
Altoid - curiously strong.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby piqaboo » Wed Aug 10, 2005 2:43 pm

Dinner in Bolton - oh my!

Saw a woman in headscarf with young boy, while I was calming Altoid. They literally ran past the dance clubs til they rounded the corner and were out of sight (I was standing on the corner when I saw this).

The waiter and manager in the indian restaurant offered, repeatedly, to watch Altoid (who was very fussy) so I could enjoy my meal. I've never had such a generous offer in the US. The waiter played with Altoid from the minute we entered the restaurant. She found their waterfall very soothing.

OT and I ordered mango lassi, inspiring the rest of our table to a new addiction.

Note of surprise: the two most expensive meals of the entire trip were the two indian restaurants we went to. Both were entirely delicious.
Altoid - curiously strong.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 2:57 pm

Originally posted by treebeau:
Doesn't look like a REAL airport!
Only one (little) person visible.
Where are all the sleeping foreigners? Hare Krishnas handing out flowers? Airport security personnel?

Regards,
Tim :) B.
It's amazing how quiet parts of an airport can be when it's not an international hub. Sandy Eggo's Lindbergh Field is too small to be a hub, so we don't get the traffic.

Bonus trivia question for you non-Sandy-Eggans:
Why is it called Lindbergh Field?

:D
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Trumpetmaster » Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:16 pm

Awesome pictures!
Thanks for sharing!!!!
Ability is what you're capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Shapley » Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:18 pm

Well, if my memory serves me well, the Spirit of St. Louis was built by Ryan Aircraft in San Diego. I would gather that it departed on its maiden flight to Roosevelt Field from there.
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Trumpetmaster » Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:18 pm

Originally posted by treebeau:
Doesn't look like a REAL airport!
Only one (little) person visible.
Where are all the sleeping foreigners? Hare Krishnas handing out flowers? Airport security personnel?

Regards,
Tim :) B.
ROFL - I needed that one at this time of day!!! :)
Ability is what you're capable of doing. Motivation determines what you do. Attitude determines how well you do it.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:35 pm

Originally posted by Shapley:
Well, if my memory serves me well, the Spirit of St. Louis was built by Ryan Aircraft in San Diego. I would gather that it departed on its maiden flight to Roosevelt Field from there.
And the bonus prize(being doubled for such quick response, no less) goes to Shapley! It was built there and Charles Lindbergh flew it from there to Roosevelt field, and if I remember correctly, set a record for transcontinental flight in the process. The airport terminal now sports an exact reproduction of the Spirit of St. Louis suspended from the ceiling, built by non other than Frank Tallman. It is the only exact copy extant.

Next Sandy Eggo trivia question: Who was Alonzo Horton, and what is his claim to fame?

:D
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Shapley » Wed Aug 10, 2005 3:47 pm

RE:Alonzo Horton

Wasn't he a character on Sanford and Son?

Actually, I'd have to cheat and Google that one, so I'll let someone else have a shot at it.

V/R
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby treebeau » Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:29 pm

"Corner Lot Horton" ??

The guy that owned all that land that is NOW downtown San Diego??

Never heard of him!!

Regards,
Tim :) B.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby Trumpetmaster » Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:34 pm

Do I get extra credit for this response? ;)

Alonzo Erastus Horton (1813-1909)

"I'm getting tired of handling so much money."

Alonzo Erastus Horton reportedly made this statement while selling the two-hundred and twenty-six blocks of what is now downtown San Diego. And no wonder. His outlay for eight-hundred acres purchased at an auction in 1867 totaled only thirty-three cents an acre. Two years later he paid $4,000 for a one-hundred and sixty acre parcel needed to sew up the section known as the Horton Addition.

These figures surfaced in research by Dr. Robert F. Heilbron. Other historians have credited Horton with a twenty-seven cents per acre figure.

Horton started something big and it was fueled in 1885 by the resumption of railroad service to an eastward connection. "San Diego became real estate mad," according to the Federal Writers' Project book San Diego: A California City. "People lived in tents on their lots until they could clear away the brush and cactus. More frequently they sold out at fancy prices before they could settle on the land. Buyers bought from maps without inspecting the purchase, and in turn sold to other speculators sight unseen."

Local people jumped on the bandwagon. Housewives, lawyers, clerks, ministers, maids and businesssmen began buying and selling. Some speculators paid as much as five-hundred dollars for a place in line to buy property.

This became the first peak in a real estate roller coaster ride that first delighted then devastated speculators on at least three occasions between the 1867 birth of the Horton Addition and 1906. Horton counted the greenbacks, then invested in more land or new ventures. He gave lots to the Methodists, Episcopalians and Baptists for new churches. He donated land to people who pledged to build houses at once. He donated the site for the proposed courthouse. Sometimes he paid his employees with property.

Some businessmen called him "Corner Lot Horton." This term of derision came from his practice of offering smaller-than-normal corner parcels at prices twenty-five percent higher than lots next door, recalled Don M. Stewart in Frontier Port. The canny Horton, however, knew shop owners and some home buyers preferred the higher visibility on the corners. His new addition lacked alleys. People just used them for trash, Horton maintained, based on what he had seen in San Francisco and other cities, so he eliminated them.

Born in Connecticut in 1813, Horton moved near Lake Winnebago, Wisconsin, where almost single-handedly he created the city now known as Hortonville (pop. 2,000).

The lure of gold brought him West in 1849. He profited more from supplying ice and store merchandise in the Mother Lode than panning for the metal. He opened a San Francisco used furniture store, capitalizing on its booming population and the refurbishing needs caused by frequent fires. He foresaw even better returns in San Diego after hearing a speaker describe its climate, the harbor, the impact of a proposed railroad and the ample space for stores, homes and factories.

At the age of fifty-four he headed south on the steamer Pacific. Good downtown San Francisco lots then sold for $10,000 or more so Horton probably chortled when his bid of two-hundred and sixty-five dollars gave him title to those eight-hundred acres. But he also knew a major promotional effort must follow.

Horton returned to San Francisco. He gave maps, brochures and a spiel to anyone who appeared solvent and would listen. Hired runners helped spread the word and Horton collared anyone who showed some interest.

His efforts began paying off. In time tourists themselves helped. They returned home from Southern California with missionary zeal, buttonholing neighbors and writing newspapers about the American Riviera they had visited. Soon Horton could complain about handling all that money. He plowed it back: $45,000 for a new wharf at the end of Fifth Avenue; $150,000 for the one-hundred room Horton House.

0ld timers scoffed at someone loony enough to build a hotel off the beaten track at what is now Third and Broadway with the business hub then at Fifth and Market. But Horton's hunch proved right. He helped start the first library by swapping a downtown lot for books from historian Hubert H. Bancroft.

A lifelong Republican, Horton decreed that only bonafide supporters would be on his payroll. Party conversions occurred whenever real estate booms began and he hired more workers, because the town leaned toward Democratic policies. His contemporaries regarded Horton as an honest and crackerjack, if somewhat eccentric, promoter, but an ineffectual businessman, according to Don Stewart, a former councilman, Postmaster and Democratic Party leader, who was born in San Diego six years after Horton arrived. When real estate values dropped, Horton lost most of the money he had tired of counting. The bank he founded, the hotel and other enterprises passed into the control of others.

Most people regard Horton as the father of San Diego. Others point to Juan Cabrillo who was the first to discover San Diego Bay in 1542. Some nominate Junipero Serra, the padre who guided the establishment of Alta California's first mission in 1769. William Heath Davis rates the "father" title, in Stewart's view. Davis was the catalyst for the 1850 development of New Town in the vicinity of today's Broadway, Front and the harbor. The project failed miserably.

Whatever Horton's parental ranking, he stands out as a herculean promoter who envisioned the metropolis San Diego one day would become. And he possessed the courage to act upon his vision.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby treebeau » Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:35 pm

Originally posted by OperaTenor:
...While singing, I could hear myself and those around me...
Well, after all, a tenor.

...yet there didn't seem to be an excess of reverberation.
Errr, try harder next time??

Regards,
Tim :) :D
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 4:38 pm

I see the power of Google at work.

:D

Bonus points to Treebeau for cutting to the chase, and bonus points to TrumpetMaster for showing his work.

Okay, now it's someone else's turn.....

:D

From my understanding, however, the writer TM quotes got some of it wrong. What Horton did was lay out smaller city blocks, the result being more corner lots, which would command a higher price. Today, if you walk around downtown San Diego, the smaller blocks are obvious.

<small>[ 08-10-2005, 05:42 PM: Message edited by: OperaTenor ]</small>
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby piqaboo » Wed Aug 10, 2005 5:55 pm

More pix, dude. ;)
Altoid - curiously strong.
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby OperaTenor » Wed Aug 10, 2005 6:29 pm

A bit demanding, aren't we?!! :p

Didn't like the hijack to SD trivia, did we?!!

Okay, as you wish......
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Re: Looking for OT

Postby piqaboo » Wed Aug 10, 2005 6:38 pm

I know you cant actually remember the trip, sweetie (that was good beer, wasnt it), but fake something for everyone, please. ;)
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