Where do you think Iraq is?

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Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby lliam » Fri Nov 22, 2002 7:42 am

Is Iraq even in the world? Don't know, don't care. There'll be nothing left of it soon anyway.. KRISTAL SNOW AND HAGATHA CHRISTIE 80 PER CENT OF AMERICANS CAN'T FIND BUSH'S TARGET<BR> <BR>From Richard Wallace Us Editor, In New York<BR> <BR> <BR>GEORGE Bush is on the brink of invading Iraq - but most Americans have no idea where the country is.<P>A survey revealed that only one in seven aged between 18 and 24 could identify Saddam Hussein's land.<P>And while more than half knew that al-Qaeda and the Taliban were based in Afghanistan, only one in six could find the country on a map.<P>Even more worrying - one in 10 couldn't pick out America.<P>When the Daily Mirror carried out a poll of 100 people on the streets of New York yesterday, we found that 80 per cent didn't have a clue where Iraq was.<P>Yesterday President Bush asked for military support from 60 countries, including Britain, as he prepared for an assault on Baghdad, which he is threatening if Saddam defies a UN resolution to get rid of weapons of mass destruction.<P>At least 12,000 Americans should know where Iraq is - they are the troops currently massed just over the border in Kuwait.<P>The poll that highlighted the Americans' ignorance about Iraq - population 22 million, area 260,000 square miles - was carried out by the National Geographic Society.<P>The Mirror poll was carried out at the self-proclaimed centre of the world - Times Square on Broadway.<P>New York cop John Riley, mounted on his trusty steed Hoss, studied our map for several minutes, saying: "I've got to get this right."<P>Then, with his finger hovering over northern Europe, he declared: "I know it's round here somewhere.<P>"Ah yes, there."<P>With a firm stab of his finger, he picked Austria as the new Iraq. Hope he's better with an identity parade.<P>Young couple John and Joan Jubett, from Manhattan, wanted some help.<P>Waving half-heartedly at South America, John asked: "Is it here somewhere? Or here?" He skimmed across the atlas to China. Finally he settled on northern Italy.<P>One girl in her twenties, clearly pondering a greater philosophical question, asked: "Is Iraq even in the world."<P>A burly construction worker barked: "Don't know, don't care, they'll be nothing left of it soon anyway."<P>There was no messing about from Tracey Shauger, 21, and pal Misty Wright, 20, from Michigan.<P>Five seconds' consideration and a firm "here", as both agreed Iraq was in the Gobi desert. Wrong - that's in Mongolia.<P>Drag queens Kristal Snow and Hagatha Christie, from the Lower East Side, were equally sure.<P>Hagatha hissed: "Oh, that Saddam is such a naughty boy. I know where he lives, it's right here," pointing at Norway. "No, no," said Kristal. "That's where I'm from.<P>"Iraq is right there."<P>Er, good morning Vietnam.<P>Others placed Iraq in France, Germany, Albania, the Caspian Sea, South Africa and Nicaragua.<P>Many of those who couldn't locate it admitted to feeling ashamed.<P>Carina Jannetta, 27, said: "I guess I should know. I am interested in foreign policy - I am against any kind of conflict. I know plenty about the issues but I guess my geography isn't what it could be."<P>Myra Dunlap, 54, admitted: "I can barely find the US. I'm not stupid, I'm just ashamed to admit I'm really bad at geography."<P>Rochelle Fox, 32, on holiday from California, said: "I know it is in the Middle East. I'm not that stupid, but I just can't quite remember exactly where on the map."<P>Theresa Livingstone, 32, admitted: "I guess I should know. There's enough about it on the news every day. I know it is close to Iran and Afghanistan, but I just can't find it."<P>Roberto Rios, 56, said: "I may not know where it is on the map, but that doesn't mean I do not care about the issues involved."<P>Jay Greany, 40, who also failed the test, admitted: "It's quite embarrassing. I should pay more attention." There were still those who were nearly up to the challenge. Kejli Jensen, 35, from Brooklyn took his time and plumped for Turkey. Close, but no cigar.<P>Johan Samora, 26, insisted: "I'll get it right next time." And Diana Grullon, 23, said: "I only can't find it because I'm wearing my glasses." Larry Layugan, 47, from Hawaii, said: "I'm not embarrassed that I didn't find it. At least I got the right area of the world."<P>Josephine Bloomer, 67, pointed at Afghanistan. Then she said: "I was close, but it bothers me that I didn't know."<P>Those who did get it right were ashamed of their fellow countrymen's performance.<P>Jordan Stevens, 25, from Brooklyn, was one of the quickest to find Iraq.<P>Despite the experiences of many of his fellow citizens, he insisted: "Us Americans aren't as dumb as you think we are, you know."<P>Sean Condron, 33, echoed his sentiments, bragging: "You think us Americans are all bad at geography but I got it. Ha!"<P>Elise Pritchard, 45, despaired that so many people did not know where Iraq was.<P>She said: "It's on the TV and in the papers ever day. How can you pay so little attention to what is happening that you don't know that?"<P>Anne Rothschild, 56, said: "We are totally connected to Iraq right now.<P>"It's a very scary situation. We need to educate everyone about what is happening.<P>"But it is in the paper every day, and in magazines and endless TV shows . It's hard to know what else we can do.<P>"We need to raise awareness of things happening outside the US.<P>"I guess people just aren't interested enough."<P>Oliver Wildman, 22, found Iraq instantly. He said: "I'm constantly amazed at how little my friends know about what is happening outside the US. Well, inside it too.<P>"Not that it stops them mouthing off about it in the bar."<P>Maggie Miller, 48, said: "When they are talking about a story on the news I want to figure out where it is.<P>"We Americans as a whole are very insular. We need to understand about the rest of the world."<P>Eurydice Thomas, 32, from California, said: "I got it but then I do have a masters degree in geography!<P>"But geography education in America is in a sad state. It needs a lot more attention, especially now with so many conflicts.<P>"We need to change the way news is reported so that people become more aware of what parts of the world are involved."<P>Meredith Lissack, 24, said: "It's bad if someone can't find it. People don't have any concept of what's going on in the world right now."<P>Michael Tolesny, 35, said: "I knew where it wasn't then I narrowed it down."<P>And Kimberly Wheeler, 24, California, bragged: "Of course I know where it is."<P>Charles Humpstone, 71, from Vermont, got it straight away, but his daughter Alessandra, 41, did not have a clue.<P>"Shame on you," he laughed.<P>One irate pensioner, who had an east European accent, didn't want to get involved.<P>He said: "I know what you're doing - you're trying to make us out to be stupid.<P>"If you think you're so clever you tell me the capital of *Belarus.<P>"Hey? Hey? You don't know, you don't know. I know where Iraq is - I'm just not telling you."<P>(*For the record, the capital of Belarus is Minsk.)<P>Americans have always been notoriously insular - just a sixth of them hold passports - and asking them to find anywhere outside the United States on a map is a daunting challenge.<P>The National Geographic Society survey said that nearly half of American youngsters couldn't pinpoint France or the UK either.<P>Society president John Fahey asked: "If our young people can't find places on a map and lack awareness of current events, how can they understand the cultural, economic and natural resource issues that confront us?"<P>Britt Meylan, 32, a sales executive from Texas was in no doubt where to find Iraq.<P>Grabbing the Mirror's atlas, she immediately pointed it out, correctly identified all the countries on its borders and thrust the book back, demanding: "Anything else?<P>"And by the way we're going to kick Saddam's butt."<P>TRAFFIC POLICEMAN JOHN RILEY<P>I must get this right. It's around here somewhere..<P>THERESA LIVINGSTONE" I knew it was close to Afghanistan but I just couldn''t find it<P>CARINA JANNETTA" I guess I should have known..I'm interested in foreign policy<P>ROBERTO RIOS I don't know where it is..but the war is bad for everybody<P>JORDAN WEISZ<P>Us Americans<P>aren't all as dumb<P>as you think we are.
Lliam.

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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby DavidEB310 » Fri Nov 22, 2002 11:41 am

I know where it is...<P>It's located in a headline on the newspaper where my cat's litter box resides.<P>Can't think of a better place for it.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby shostakovich » Fri Nov 22, 2002 3:24 pm

Thanks, Lliam, for pointing out how unaware we (some of us) are about geography. It was good, also, to read that many people COULD find it. Now here's a challenge. Without looking at a map, is Iraq in Europe, Asia, or Africa?<BR>Shos, whose grandmothers were both born near Minsk (and I couldn't have found that on the map).
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby Bones » Fri Nov 22, 2002 4:09 pm

A better question is...where does Europe end and Asia start. I remember being taught that the boundary was a line going through the Caspian Sea (in that case I guess Iraq is in Europe). To tell the truth, I'm not sure where the true boundary really is. I assume there is a continental divide around there somewhere.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby BenMurphy6 » Fri Nov 22, 2002 5:02 pm

the common geographical boundary is down the ural mountains, which then goes through the caspian sea. however, this means russia is in both europe and asia, so there really isn't a clear boundary. the middle east, however, is considered to be in asia. i believe in that region, turkey forms the demarcation (turkey being considered in asia). <P>i've known this off the top of my head since my freshman year in high school; in fact, i can tell you where just about any country in the world is (except for the polynesian islands). AND, i went to public schools! i can understand how someone might not know where, for example, djibouti is. but not knowing where in the world iraq is is pretty pathetic.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby priya978 » Fri Nov 22, 2002 11:48 pm

We're being taught in school now that the border are the mountains, I forget which ones, but the Caspian Sea. I know where all of those are, but then, you know me, I won the geography bee two years in a row with 3rd place, I don't really have anything exciting going for me.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby lliam » Sat Nov 23, 2002 7:28 am

Background: <BR>Formerly part of the Ottoman Empire, Iraq became an independent kingdom in 1932. A "republic" was proclaimed in 1958, but in actuality a series of military strongmen have ruled the country since then, the latest being SADDAM Husayn. Territorial disputes with Iran led to an inconclusive and costly eight-year war (1980-88). In August 1990 Iraq seized Kuwait, but was expelled by US-led, UN coalition forces during January-February 1991. The victors did not occupy Iraq, however, thus allowing the regime to stay in control. Following Kuwait's liberation, the UN Security Council (UNSC) required Iraq to scrap all weapons of mass destruction and long-range missiles and to allow UN verification inspections. UN trade sanctions remain in effect due to incomplete Iraqi compliance with relevant UNSC resolutions. <BR> Geography <BR>Location: <BR>Middle East, bordering the Persian Gulf, between Iran and Kuwait <BR>Geographic coordinates: <BR>33 00 N, 44 00 E <BR>Map references: <BR>Middle East <BR>Area: <BR>total: 437,072 sq km <BR>water: 4,910 sq km <BR>land: 432,162 sq km <BR>Area - comparative: <BR>slightly more than twice the size of Idaho <BR>Land boundaries: <BR>total: 3,650 km <BR>border countries: Iran 1,458 km, Jordan 181 km, Kuwait 240 km, Saudi Arabia 814 km, Syria 605 km, Turkey 352 km <BR>Coastline: <BR>58 km <BR>Maritime claims: <BR>continental shelf: not specified <BR>territorial sea: 12 NM <BR>Climate: <BR>mostly desert; mild to cool winters with dry, hot, cloudless summers; northern mountainous regions along Iranian and Turkish borders experience cold winters with occasionally heavy snows that melt in early spring, sometimes causing extensive flooding in central and southern Iraq <BR>Terrain: <BR>mostly broad plains; reedy marshes along Iranian border in south with large flooded areas; mountains along borders with Iran and Turkey <BR>Elevation extremes: <BR>lowest point: Persian Gulf 0 m <BR>highest point: Haji Ibrahim 3,600 m <BR>Natural resources: <BR>petroleum, natural gas, phosphates, sulfur <BR>Land use: <BR>arable land: 12% <BR>permanent crops: 1% <BR>other: 87% (1998 est.) <BR>Irrigated land: <BR>35,250 sq km (1998 est.) <BR>Natural hazards: <BR>dust storms, sandstorms, floods <BR>Environment - current issues: <BR>government water control projects have drained most of the inhabited marsh areas east of An Nasiriyah by drying up or diverting the feeder streams and rivers; a once sizable population of Shi'a Muslims, who have inhabited these areas for thousands of years, has been displaced; furthermore, the destruction of the natural habitat poses serious threats to the area's wildlife populations; inadequate supplies of potable water; development of Tigris-Euphrates Rivers system contingent upon agreements with upstream riparian Turkey; air and water pollution; soil degradation (salination) and erosion; desertification <BR>Environment - international agreements: <BR>party to: Law of the Sea, Nuclear Test Ban <BR>signed, but not ratified: Environmental Modification <BR>Geography - note: <BR>strategic location on Shatt al Arab waterway and at the head of the Persian Gulf <BR> People <BR>Population: <BR>24,001,816 (July 2002 est.) <BR>Age structure: <BR>0-14 years: 41.1% (male 5,003,755; female 4,849,238) <BR>15-64 years: 55.9% (male 6,794,265; female 6,624,662) <BR>65 years and over: 3% (male 341,520; female 388,376) (2002 est.) <BR>Population growth rate: <BR>2.82% (2002 est.) <BR>Birth rate: <BR>34.2 births/1,000 population (2002 est.) <BR>Death rate: <BR>6.02 deaths/1,000 population (2002 est.) <BR>Net migration rate: <BR>0 migrant(s)/1,000 population (2002 est.) <BR>Sex ratio: <BR>at birth: 1.05 male(s)/female <BR>under 15 years: 1.03 male(s)/female <BR>15-64 years: 1.03 male(s)/female <BR>65 years and over: 0.88 male(s)/female <BR>total population: 1.02 male(s)/female (2002 est.) <BR>Infant mortality rate: <BR>57.61 deaths/1,000 live births (2002 est.) <BR>Life expectancy at birth: <BR>total population: 67.38 years <BR>female: 68.5 years (2002 est.) <BR>male: 66.31 years <BR>Total fertility rate: <BR>4.63 children born/woman (2002 est.) <BR>HIV/AIDS - adult prevalence rate: <BR>less than 0.01% (1999 est.) <BR>HIV/AIDS - people living with HIV/AIDS: <BR>NA <BR>HIV/AIDS - deaths: <BR>NA <BR>Nationality: <BR>noun: Iraqi(s) <BR>adjective: Iraqi <BR>Ethnic groups: <BR>Arab 75%-80%, Kurdish 15%-20%, Turkoman, Assyrian or other 5% <BR>Religions: <BR>Muslim 97% (Shi'a 60%-65%, Sunni 32%-37%), Christian or other 3% <BR>Languages: <BR>Arabic, Kurdish (official in Kurdish regions), Assyrian, Armenian <BR>Literacy: <BR>definition: age 15 and over can read and write <BR>total population: 58% <BR>male: 70.7% <BR>female: 45% (1995 est.) <BR> Government <BR>Country name: <BR>conventional long form: Republic of Iraq <BR>conventional short form: Iraq <BR>local short form: Al Iraq <BR>local long form: Al Jumhuriyah al Iraqiyah <BR>Government type: <BR>republic <BR>Capital: <BR>Baghdad <BR>Administrative divisions: <BR>18 provinces (muhafazat, singular - muhafazah); Al Anbar, Al Basrah, Al Muthanna, Al Qadisiyah, An Najaf, Arbil, As Sulaymaniyah, At Ta'mim, Babil, Baghdad, Dahuk, Dhi Qar, Diyala, Karbala', Maysan, Ninawa, Salah ad Din, Wasit <BR>Independence: <BR>3 October 1932 (from League of Nations mandate under British administration) <BR>National holiday: <BR>Revolution Day, 17 July (1968) <BR>Constitution: <BR>22 September 1968, effective 16 July 1970 (provisional constitution); new constitution drafted in 1990 but not adopted <BR>Legal system: <BR>based on Islamic law in special religious courts, civil law system elsewhere; has not accepted compulsory ICJ jurisdiction <BR>Suffrage: <BR>18 years of age; universal <BR>Executive branch: <BR>chief of state: President SADDAM Husayn (since 16 July 1979); Vice Presidents Taha Muhyi al-Din MARUF (since 21 April 1974) and Taha Yasin RAMADAN (since 23 March 1991) <BR>elections: president and vice presidents elected by a two-thirds majority of the Revolutionary Command Council; election last held 17 October 1995 (next to be held NA 2002) <BR>election results: SADDAM Husayn reelected president; percent of vote - 99%; Taha Muhyi al-Din MARUF and Taha Yasin RAMADAN elected vice presidents; percent of vote - NA% <BR>cabinet: Council of Ministers; note - there is also a Revolutionary Command Council or RCC with eight members as of 2001 (Chairman SADDAM Husayn, Vice Chairman Izzat IBRAHIM al-Duri) which controls the ruling Ba'th Party; the RCC is the highest executive and legislative body and the most powerful political entity in the country; new RCC members must come from the Regional Command Leadership of the Ba'th Party <BR>head of government: Prime Minister SADDAM Husayn (since 29 May 1994); Deputy Prime Ministers Tariq Mikhail AZIZ (since NA 1979), Hikmat Mizban Ibrahim al-AZZAWI (since 30 July 1999), Ahmad Husayn al-KHUDAYIR (since NA July 2001), and Abd al-Tawab Mullah al-HUWAYSH (since NA July 2001) <BR>Legislative branch: <BR>unicameral National Assembly or Majlis al-Watani (250 seats; 30 appointed by the president to represent the three northern provinces of Dahuk, Arbil, and As Sulaymaniyah; 220 elected by popular vote; members serve four-year terms) <BR>elections: last held 27 March 2000 (next to be held NA March 2004) <BR>election results: percent of vote by party - NA%; seats by party - NA <BR>Judicial branch: <BR>Court of Cassation <BR>Political parties and leaders: <BR>Ba'th Party [SADDAM Husayn, central party leader] <BR>Political pressure groups and leaders: <BR>any formal political activity must be sanctioned by the government; opposition to regime from Kurdish groups and southern Shi'a dissidents <BR>International organization participation: <BR>ABEDA, ACC, AFESD, AL, AMF, CAEU, CCC, EAPC, ESCWA, FAO, G-19, G-77, IAEA, IBRD, ICAO, ICRM, IDA, IDB, IFAD, IFC, IFRCS, ILO, IMF, IMO, Interpol, IOC, ISO, ITU, NAM, OAPEC, OIC, OPEC, PCA, UN, UNCTAD, UNESCO, UNIDO, UPU, WFTU, WHO, WIPO, WMO, WToO <BR>Diplomatic representation in the US: <BR>none; note - Iraq has an Interest Section in the Algerian Embassy headed by Akram AL DOURI; address: Iraqi Interests Section, Algerian Embassy, 1801 P Street NW, Washington, DC 20036; telephone: [1] (202) 483-7500; FAX: [1] (202) 462-5066 <BR>Diplomatic representation from the US: <BR>none; note - the US has an Interests Section in the Polish Embassy in Baghdad; address: P. O. Box 2051 Hay Babel, Baghdad; telephone: [964] (1) 718-9267; FAX: [964] (1) 718-9297 <BR>Flag description: <BR>three equal horizontal bands of red (top), white, and black with three green five-pointed stars in a horizontal line centered in the white band; the phrase ALLAHU AKBAR (God is Great) in green Arabic script - Allahu to the right of the middle star and Akbar to the left of the middle star - was added in January 1991 during the Persian Gulf crisis; similar to the flag of Syria which has two stars but no script and the flag of Yemen which has a plain white band; also similar to the flag of Egypt which has a symbolic eagle centered in the white band <BR> Economy <BR>Economy - overview: <BR>Iraq's economy is dominated by the oil sector, which has traditionally provided about 95% of foreign exchange earnings. In the 1980s financial problems caused by massive expenditures in the eight-year war with Iran and damage to oil export facilities by Iran led the government to implement austerity measures, borrow heavily, and later reschedule foreign debt payments; Iraq suffered economic losses from the war of at least $100 billion. After hostilities ended in 1988, oil exports gradually increased with the construction of new pipelines and restoration of damaged facilities. Iraq's seizure of Kuwait in August 1990, subsequent international economic sanctions, and damage from military action by an international coalition beginning in January 1991 drastically reduced economic activity. Although government policies supporting large military and internal security forces and allocating resources to key supporters of the regime have hurt the economy, implementation of the UN's oil-for-food program in December 1996 has helped improve conditions for the average Iraqi citizen. For the first six, six-month phases of the program, Iraq was allowed to export limited amounts of oil in exchange for food, medicine, and some infrastructure spare parts. In December 1999 the UN Security Council authorized Iraq to export under the program as much oil as required to meet humanitarian needs. Oil exports are now more than three-quarters prewar level. However, 28% of Iraq's export revenues under the program are deducted to meet UN Compensation Fund and UN administrative expenses. The drop in GDP in 2001 was largely the result of the global economic slowdown and lower oil prices. Per capita food imports have increased significantly, while medical supplies and health care services are steadily improving. Per capita output and living standards are still well below the prewar level, but any estimates have a wide range of error. <BR>GDP: <BR>purchasing power parity - $59 billion (2001 est.) <BR>GDP - real growth rate: <BR>-5.7% (2001 est.) <BR>GDP - per capita: <BR>purchasing power parity - $2,500 (2001 est.) <BR>GDP - composition by sector: <BR>agriculture: 6% <BR>industry: 13% <BR>services: 81% (1993 est.) <BR>Population below poverty line: <BR>NA% <BR>Household income or consumption by percentage share: <BR>lowest 10%: NA% <BR>highest 10%: NA% <BR>Inflation rate (consumer prices): <BR>60% (2001 est.) <BR>Labor force: <BR>4.4 million (1989) <BR>Labor force - by occupation: <BR>agriculture NA%, industry NA%, services NA% <BR>Unemployment rate: <BR>NA% <BR>Budget: <BR>revenues: $NA <BR>expenditures: $NA, including capital expenditures of $NA <BR>Industries: <BR>petroleum, chemicals, textiles, construction materials, food processing <BR>Industrial production growth rate: <BR>NA% <BR>Electricity - production: <BR>27.3 billion kWh (2000) <BR>Electricity - production by source: <BR>fossil fuel: 98.17% <BR>hydro: 1.83% <BR>other: 0% (2000) <BR>nuclear: 0% <BR>Electricity - consumption: <BR>25.389 billion kWh (2000) <BR>Electricity - exports: <BR>0 kWh (2000) <BR>Electricity - imports: <BR>0 kWh (2000) <BR>Agriculture - products: <BR>wheat, barley, rice, vegetables, dates, cotton; cattle, sheep <BR>Exports: <BR>$15.8 billion (f.o.b., 2001 est.) <BR>Exports - commodities: <BR>crude oil <BR>Exports - partners: <BR>US 46.2%, Italy 12.2%, France 9.6%, Spain 8.6% (2000) <BR>Imports: <BR>$11 billion (f.o.b., 2001 est.) <BR>Imports - commodities: <BR>food, medicine, manufactures <BR>Imports - partners: <BR>France 22.5%, Australia 22%, China 5.8%, Russia 5.8% (2000) <BR>Debt - external: <BR>$62.2 billion (2001 est.) <BR>Economic aid - recipient: <BR>$327.5 million (1995) <BR>Currency: <BR>Iraqi dinar (IQD) <BR>Currency code: <BR>IQD <BR>Exchange rates: <BR>Iraqi dinars per US dollar - 0.3109 (fixed official rate since 1982); black market rate - Iraqi dinars per US dollar - 2,000 (December 2001), 1,910 (December 1999), 1,815 (December 1998), 1,530 (December 1997), 910 (December 1996); note - subject to wide fluctuations <BR>Fiscal year: <BR>calendar year <BR> Communications Iraq Top of Page <BR>Telephones - main lines in use: <BR>675,000 (1997) <BR>Telephones - mobile cellular: <BR>NA; service available in northern Iraq (2001) <BR>Telephone system: <BR>general assessment: reconstitution of damaged telecommunication facilities began after the Gulf war; most damaged facilities have been rebuilt <BR>domestic: the network consists of coaxial cables and microwave radio relay links <BR>international: satellite earth stations - 2 Intelsat (1 Atlantic Ocean and 1 Indian Ocean), 1 Intersputnik (Atlantic Ocean region), and 1 Arabsat (inoperative); coaxial cable and microwave radio relay to Jordan, Kuwait, Syria, and Turkey; Kuwait line is probably nonoperational <BR>Radio broadcast stations: <BR>AM 19 (5 are inactive), FM 51, shortwave 4 (1998) <BR>Radios: <BR>4.85 million (1997) <BR>Television broadcast stations: <BR>13 (1997) <BR>Televisions: <BR>1.75 million (1997) <BR>Internet country code: <BR>.iq <BR>Internet Service Providers (ISPs): <BR>1 (2000) <BR>Internet users: <BR>12,500 (2001) <BR> Transportation <BR>Railways: <BR>total: 2,339 km <BR>standard gauge: 2,339 km 1.435-m gauge (2001) <BR>Highways: <BR>total: 45,550 km <BR>paved: 38,400 km <BR>unpaved: 7,150 km (1996 est.) <BR>Waterways: <BR>1,015 km <BR>note: Shatt al Arab is usually navigable by maritime traffic for about 130 km; channel has been dredged to 3 m and is in use; Tigris and Euphrates Rivers have navigable sections for shallow-draft boats; Shatt al Basrah canal was navigable by shallow-draft craft before closing in 1991 because of the Gulf war <BR>Pipelines: <BR>crude oil 4,350 km; petroleum products 725 km; natural gas 1,360 km <BR>Ports and harbors: <BR>Umm Qasr, Khawr az Zubayr, and Al Basrah have limited functionality <BR>Merchant marine: <BR>total: 25 ships (1,000 GRT or over) totaling 186,709 GRT/278,575 DWT <BR>ships by type: cargo 14, passenger 1, passenger/cargo 1, petroleum tanker 8, roll on/roll off 1 (2002 est.) <BR>Airports: <BR>108 (2001) <BR>Airports - with paved runways: <BR>total: 73 <BR>over 3,047 m: 20 <BR>2,438 to 3,047 m: 34 <BR>914 to 1,523 m: 6 <BR>under 914 m: 7 (2001) <BR>1,524 to 2,437 m: 6 <BR>Airports - with unpaved runways: <BR>total: 35 <BR>under 914 m: 12 (2001) <BR>over 3,047 m: 3 <BR>2,438 to 3,047 m: 6 <BR>914 to 1,523 m: 10 <BR>1,524 to 2,437 m: 4 <BR>Heliports: <BR>4 (2001) <BR> Military <BR>Military branches: <BR>Army, Republican Guard, Navy, Air Force, Air Defense Force, Border Guard Force, Fedayeen Saddam <BR>Military manpower - military age: <BR>18 years of age (2002 est.) <BR>Military manpower - availability: <BR>males age 15-49: 6,135,847 (2002 est.) <BR>Military manpower - fit for military service: <BR>males age 15-49: 3,430,819 (2002 est.) <BR>Military manpower - reaching military age annually: <BR>males: 274,035 (2002 est.) <BR>Military expenditures - dollar figure: <BR>$1.3 billion (FY00) <BR>Military expenditures - percent of GDP: <BR>NA% <BR> Transnational Issues Disputes - international: <BR>despite restored diplomatic relations in 1990, lacks maritime boundary with Iran and disputes land boundary, navigation channels, and other issues from eight-year war; in November 1994, Iraq formally accepted the UN-demarcated border with Kuwait which had been spelled out in Security Council Resolutions 687 (1991), 773 (1993), and 883 (1993); this formally ends earlier claims to Kuwait and to Bubiyan and Warbah islands although the government continues periodic rhetorical challenges; dispute over water development plans by Turkey for the Tigris and Euphrates rivers <P> <BR> ;) :cool:
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby shostakovich » Sat Nov 23, 2002 6:01 pm

Huff, puff! After digging out of all that information, it turns out Iraq is in Asia. I never found a definitive map of Europe or Asia with countries listed. But the boundary follows the Urals, bends a bit west to go through the Caspian, comes out of the Caspian with a big westward shift, cutting through the Caucasus Mts (south of Azerbaijan?), then bordering the Black Sea on the south, turning south through Constantinople, and then splitting the Sinai peninsula from Africa. Anyway, that's what I put together from a variety of sources. Any corrections appreciated. The sources agree that the entire middle east is in Asia.<BR>Shos
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby shostakovich » Sat Nov 23, 2002 6:13 pm

Now that I think of it, the problems of the middle east may have something to do with a country (Israel), largely of transplanted Europeans, fitting uncomfortably in Asia (not to mention the obvious religious differences).<BR>Shos
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby shostakovich » Sat Nov 23, 2002 8:06 pm

I FOUND IT!!! Asia goes south along the Urals to Khazakhstan, and west along its northern border into the Caspian. It exits the Caspian on the northern borders of Azerbaijan and Georgia (approximately along the Caucasus Mts) into the Black Sea. Then it borders the Black sea turning south through Constantinople. The Sinai is part of Africa. The entire middle east, excluding Egypt, is in Asia. Anybody else excited about this?<P>Just to put a little musical spin on this, Khachaturian was Georgian, Alan Hovhaness was Scottish-Armenian, and Fikret Amirov was Azerbaijanian.<BR>Shos
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby Bones » Sat Nov 23, 2002 8:18 pm

I remember back in my youth, also known as the Dark Ages, that the area was called Asia Minor. Does anybody use that term anymore? I don't recall hearing it used for the past 20 years (at least).
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby priya978 » Sat Nov 23, 2002 8:42 pm

I hear it every so often, I don't know what it is, but still I hear it.<BR>All this information is too much to comprhend, plus it's boring to me. i don't really care anything about Iraq, or any other place in the Middle East, they could all die for all i care.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby BenMurphy6 » Sat Nov 23, 2002 10:16 pm

shos: i'm excited ;)
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby annettehala » Sun Nov 24, 2002 8:19 pm

You know, they did that same poll in Japan and the results were much worse. In fact most Japanese thought Iraq was in Africa or South America.
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby shostakovich » Sun Nov 24, 2002 10:40 pm

Bless your soul, Ben. Bones, I was looking over part of an old (maybe 5 years) video, and "Asia Minor" was right there on the screen between Turkey and the Middle East.<BR>Shos
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby lliam » Mon Nov 25, 2002 7:45 am

A nice variation of responses on this particular topic.<P>I love to read peoples different views and, I think we all gain a little knowledge from each other. That's why I love b.com.<BR>Thank's everyone for your input on this topic.<BR>Lliam. ;) :cool:
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby barfle » Mon Nov 25, 2002 8:12 am

The story is told (I can't vouch for its truthfulness, I'm afraid) where someone was trying to get signatures to put a measure on the ballot. The measure was the Bill of Rights - the first ten amendments to the US Constitution, which had been in effect (at that time) for well over 150 years (yes, I'm a geezer).<P>A lot of the response was refusal to sign it because it was "anti-American" or "pinko." :roll:
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby DavidEB310 » Mon Nov 25, 2002 1:44 pm

Now, are we all ready for a game of RISK or the original Trivial Pursuit Geography category?
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby dkm32 » Mon Nov 25, 2002 5:59 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by eugene a.:<BR><STRONG>I don't really have anything exciting going for me.</STRONG><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>Nah, just a good education. You may shoot from the hip a few too many times, but you do have a brain...and, you're using it. Not many kids can say that. They'll be sorry. You won't.<P>And, as for shooting from the hip...Yeah, you bug people (us?) at times, but better that that a lap puppy who can't think!!!<P>Peace!!!
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Re: Where do you think Iraq is?

Postby dkm32 » Mon Nov 25, 2002 6:04 pm

<BLOCKQUOTE><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial">quote:</font><HR><STRONG>Where do you think Iraq is?</STRONG><HR></BLOCKQUOTE><P>In the cross hairs of a <I>big</I> gun with a trigger happy Shrubhead on the other end.<P>Just my 2¢.<p>[ 11-25-2002: Message edited by: dkm32 ]
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