Top 50 Composers...or are they?

Chat with fellow classical music fans about your favorite composers. Ask a question about your favorite composition. Musicians are encouraged to post their ideas about music or a performance! This forum is for classical music fans from all around the world! Join in a classical conversation today.

Moderator: Nicole Marie

Top 50 Composers...or are they?

Postby Catmando » Wed Oct 11, 2006 12:32 pm

Top 50 Composers: Per Phil Goulding - Author of:
Classical Music: The 50 Greatest Composers and Their 1,000 Greatest Works


1 Johann Sebastian Bach
2 Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart
3 Ludwig van Beethoven
4 Richard Wagner
5 Franz Joseph Haydn
6 Johannes Brahms
7 Franz Schubert
8 Robert Schumann
9 George Frideric Handel
10 Peter Ilyitch Tchaikovsky

11 Felix Mendelssohn
12 Antonin Dvorak
13 Franz Liszt
14 Frederic Chopin
15 Igor Stravinsky
16 Giuseppe Verdi
17 Gustav Mahler
18 Sergei Prokofiev
19 Dmitri Shostakovich
20 Richard Strauss

21 Hector Berlioz
22 Claude Debussy
23 Giacomo Puccini
24 Giovanni da Palestrina
25 Anton Bruckner
26 Georg Telemann
27 Camille Saint-Saens
28 Jean Sibelius
29 Maurice Ravel
30 Gioacchino Rossini

31 Edvard Grieg
32 Christoph Gluck
33 Paul Hindemith
34 Claudio Monteverdi
35 Bela Bartok
36 Cesar Franck
37 Antonio Vivaldi
38 Georges Bizet
39 Modest Mussorgsky
40 Jean-Philippe Rameau

41 Gabriel Faure
42 Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov
43 Gaetano Donizetti
44 Ralph Vaughan Williams
45 Bedrich Smetana
46 Johann Strauss
47 Karl Maria Von Weber
48 Leos Janacek
49 Francois Couperin
50 Alexander Borodin
Last edited by Catmando on Wed Oct 11, 2006 12:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Catmando
1st Chair
 
Posts: 2866
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 1:01 am

Postby Shapley » Wed Oct 11, 2006 12:37 pm

Mahler's not in the top ten?

Vivaldi is way down at number 37?

Saint-Saens isn't in the top 20?

Nope, nope, nope. Go back and start again....
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
Shapley
Patron
 
Posts: 15196
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Postby navneeth » Wed Oct 11, 2006 12:52 pm

Wow! I've listened to the works, at least in bits and pieces, of almost every composer in that list!
Navneeth

Check out the History of the 30Q Game
navneeth
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 1873
Joined: Sun Mar 12, 2006 1:01 am
Location: Madras, India

Postby audiogirl » Wed Oct 11, 2006 1:08 pm

"Ahh, Bach."*

(for MASH watchers only.)
audiogirl
3rd Chair
 
Posts: 567
Joined: Wed Feb 21, 2001 1:01 am
Location: Middle of nowhere

Postby Shapley » Wed Oct 11, 2006 1:42 pm

I'm partial to the fugue.
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
Shapley
Patron
 
Posts: 15196
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Postby Hexameron » Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:22 pm

Yea, that list is definitely flawed. Rameau before Weber? Hindemith ahead of Mussorgsky? Donizetti is also a bizarre choice there; I would have said Bellini or Meyerbeer are "greater."
Hexameron
4th Chair
 
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

Postby Shapley » Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:35 pm

Well, there you have your homework assignment - compile your own 'top 50' list.

I guess #1 on my list would be Bachtovart.

V/R
Shapley
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
Shapley
Patron
 
Posts: 15196
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Postby Hexameron » Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:55 pm

I guess #1 on my list would be Bachtovart.


Nay, it's Beetozach!
Hexameron
4th Chair
 
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

Postby Shapley » Wed Oct 11, 2006 2:59 pm

Motovach?
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
Shapley
Patron
 
Posts: 15196
Joined: Wed Nov 13, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Cape Girardeau, MO

Postby shostakovich » Wed Oct 11, 2006 9:48 pm

I'm surprised there's but one English composer (not counting the transplanted German), and NO Amurricans. Throw out Telemann and Faure. Insert Elgar, Copland. Who does this Phil Goulding think he is????????????
GRRRRRRR
shostakovich
1st Chair
 
Posts: 3393
Joined: Sun Nov 26, 2000 1:01 am
Location: windsor, ct, usa

Postby bignaf » Wed Oct 11, 2006 9:54 pm

the lack of Americans is blasphemous.
and was the book written in the 40's? the most modern composer is Hindemith! (I get to see his blackboard 3 times a week, btw).
bignaf
1st Chair
 
Posts: 5291
Joined: Sun Oct 20, 2002 12:01 am
Location: Judean Hills

Postby Hexameron » Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:42 pm

To be fair, this isn't Goulding's own opinionated ranking system. He's not some snobby scholar pedantically pointing out why Handel is greater than Tchaikovsky; he researches many sources to figure out what the big league musicologists/musicians/historians/contemporaries etc have to say about each composer. He then compiles all of the information and tries to come up with a rudimentary list of the top 50 greatest composers.

In some ways he did a good job; I think his writing style and the format is very user-friendly and helpful for people who don't know a lot about classical music. Many of his pages have little bordered sections with anecdotes or quotes (like Beethoven's famous quote about Handel) or the fact that Brahms fell asleep to Liszt's Sonata in B minor (never forgave him for that :curse: :rofl: ).

On the other hand, I just don't think he had the right scope for taking in all of the opinions and facts from his research. The list doesn't seem realistic. Like it was mentioned before, Wagner is in no way a valid 4th contender. Sure his influence may be the largest after Bach and Beethoven, but that's not enough to make him great. I also don't think Haydn deserves such a lofty status. I think many would agree that Handel and Brahms were much superior. I also think Saint-Saens and Berlioz belong higher up, right after Liszt and Chopin.

Shos, I'm with you on the Telemann and Faure - just take them out to make room for Rachmaninoff at least.

I guess the bottom line is, the list is flawed but the writings in the book are fascinating and well-constructed.
Hexameron
4th Chair
 
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

Postby bignaf » Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:46 pm

:barf: Telemann :badputer:
:thumbdown:
bignaf
1st Chair
 
Posts: 5291
Joined: Sun Oct 20, 2002 12:01 am
Location: Judean Hills

Postby Hexameron » Wed Oct 11, 2006 10:58 pm

I might not have barfed on the poor fellow or thrown a computer at him, but I gladly stick both thumbs down. I mean... I think an obscure classical composer like Hummel is far more original, talented and proficient than Mr. Telemann. :confuscious:
Hexameron
4th Chair
 
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

Postby bignaf » Wed Oct 11, 2006 11:28 pm

precisely.
bignaf
1st Chair
 
Posts: 5291
Joined: Sun Oct 20, 2002 12:01 am
Location: Judean Hills

Postby GreatCarouser » Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:23 am

Hexameron wrote:Yea, that list is definitely flawed... Donizetti is also a bizarre choice there; I would have said Bellini or Meyerbeer are "greater."
Bellini,...Meyerbeer? Donizetti probably made the list ahead of Bellini because of his greater influence on the structure and forms of the opera as well as for his non-operatic compositions, in forms as diverse as symphonies, chamber works, piano works etc. Meyerbeer was certainly a great influence on French grand opera but suffers (unfairly) from Wagner's disdain. Unfortunately, one-trick ponies will often suffer in a list that covers such a wide base. It's very tough to be a Chopin and get on this list without a wide range of forms, or attacking the most complex form (symphony). Instead of replacing Donizetti, maybe Meyerbeer should replace Wagner. There's more justice in that.
Sacred cows make the best hamburger.
Mark Twain
GreatCarouser
2nd Chair
 
Posts: 1393
Joined: Tue Oct 19, 2004 12:01 am
Location: Semi-permanent Vacation CA

Postby OperaTenor » Thu Oct 12, 2006 12:50 am

Not only is Jack not listed in the #1 slot, but they've got him below Joe!

Sorry, this list is not valid.

:flex:
"To help mend the world is true religion."
- William Penn

http://www.one.org
OperaTenor
Patron
 
Posts: 10457
Joined: Wed Dec 11, 2002 1:01 am
Location: Paradise with Piq & Altoid, southern California

Postby Catmando » Thu Oct 12, 2006 10:21 pm

Hex & Shos,

This book does look interesting (not because I agree with all of the names and order of their excellence of course). I may just end up getting it.

One odd peculiarity (assuming you have the same cover on the book as the one I've seen on Amazon). The front cover has a portrait of Beethoven, Mozart and a man in the middle (whom one would presume is J.S. Bach). But, upon closer inspection, it looks like the "English Bach", JC Bach, JS' youngest son. Go figure! :roll:
Catmando
1st Chair
 
Posts: 2866
Joined: Tue Feb 07, 2006 1:01 am

Postby Hexameron » Fri Oct 13, 2006 7:49 am

:rofl:

Catmando... I just looked at the cover and you're right, it is JC Bach. How embarrassing that must be...

Well despite that, it is a good book and anyone can get something out of it.
Hexameron
4th Chair
 
Posts: 181
Joined: Tue Apr 11, 2006 12:01 am
Location: Winston-Salem, NC

Postby 1st_oboe » Sat Oct 14, 2006 4:44 pm

.... and where, exactly, does the great 16th century composer Anon fit in to all of this. Surely this one deserves a spot in the top 10. :deal:

:P
Insert creative phrase here.
1st_oboe
4th Chair
 
Posts: 295
Joined: Wed May 28, 2003 12:01 am
Location: Emmett, Idaho

Next

Return to Musical Notes

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot]

cron