30Q#51

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30Q#51

Postby dai bread » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:45 pm

Drumroll.

Let battle commence!
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
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Postby bignaf » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:47 pm

was the piece composed before the publication of "The Hunchback of Notredame"?
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Postby Catmando » Mon Oct 16, 2006 9:53 pm

If composition was written after the publication of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame", was it also written after the sinking of Titanic ?
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Postby Hexameron » Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:06 pm

Oh really, do we have to keep making people search for all this stuff on wikipedia and google? :screwy:
...

Was the composer born before the Boston Massacre? :twisted:
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Postby bignaf » Mon Oct 16, 2006 11:16 pm

after 50 times of asking "was it composedafter 1827?" we kinda get tired of it. :)
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Postby dai bread » Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:15 am

1. Was the piece composed before the publication of "The Hunchback of Notredame"?

No. And thank you for expanding the questions beyond American history. I'm reasonably well versed in it for a foreigner, but I need to google a lot.

2. If composition was written after the publication of "The Hunchback of Notre Dame", was it also written after the sinking of Titanic ?

No. So that gives you between 1831 and 1912.
We have no money; we must use our brains. -Ernest Rutherford.
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:00 am

Was the piece composed before the Dunedin Jewish Congregation was founded on New Zealand's South Island?
Quod scripsi, scripsi.
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Postby navneeth » Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:01 am

Was it composed after Maxwell's paper A Dynamical Theory of the Electromagnetic Field was published?
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:08 am

Was the composer born north of the equator?
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 8:10 am

Was the composer born East of the Prime Meridian (West of the International Date Line)?
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Postby Catmando » Tue Oct 17, 2006 10:28 am

Hexameron wrote:Oh really, do we have to keep making people search for all this stuff on wikipedia and google? :screwy:
...
:twisted:


A suggestion:

We could limit our ask historical questions to the world history of music?

I don't mind either way.
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Postby Hexameron » Tue Oct 17, 2006 10:36 am

That's a good idea, Cat. I think I'll even try that myself :D

But I was joking because I subsequently asked the same type of question that might require wikipedia :wink:
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Postby bignaf » Tue Oct 17, 2006 2:14 pm

I like the way we figure how music history relates to world history. but I think we should try to stick to events that are easy to aproximate. like Hunchback - if it is a piece by Beethoven, you know it's before with no need for googling, if it's a Wagner piece, you can be pretty sure it's after.
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 2:50 pm

I pick a year and then Google for an event that occured. For instance, if we've narrowed the timeframe for a piece's composition to somwhere between 1812 and 1900, and I want to narrow it further, I'll pick the year 1843, and then Google for easily found historical events of the that year, such as the building of Brunel's S.S. Great Britain.
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Postby bignaf » Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:05 pm

I think we should try to pick something someone can approximate without googling. I wouldn't have a clue what century S.S. Great Britain was built in.
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:10 pm

What! I though everyone knew that the Great Britain was built just prior to the U.S. Civil War, and that the Great Eastern, which laid the first transatlantic cable, was built in 1858.

I'm shocked! Shocked! I tell you. What are they teaching in schools these days?

I take pride in my questions. It's my little way of helping to complete your woefully inadequate education. :D
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Postby bignaf » Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:50 pm

well, in my school they taught us the difference between the Etzel, Lechi and Hagannah... :)
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:27 pm

Brunel was a British engineer, and designed a number of railway bridges, some of which, I believe, still stand. He also designed three ships: The Great Western, the Great Britain, and the Great Eastern. The Great Britain was the first vessel to combine all the components of a modern liner - metal hull, steam drive, propellor propulsion. She has been restored and now stands as a museum in Bristol.

The Great Eastern was the largest ship built, and held that record for nearly fifty years, until the Lusitania took that honour in 1906. Nearly 700 feet long, and equiped with both sail and steam (propellor and paddlewheel) even so, she was underpowered. Designed for the India trade route, the opening of the Suez Canal rendered her unneeded for that route, and she was sent to served on the transatlantic route. The U.S. Civil War cut passenger travel to and from the U.S. shortly after her completion, reducing her economic viability. She was also plagued with problems, blamed on the ghost of a riveter who had been sealed up inside her double-walled hull when she was built. She was converted from passenger service to a cable-laying ship, and lay several transatlantic cables as well as cables to India. She ended her career as a floating billboard in a British Harbour, before being broken up in 1888.

His railway bridges include the Royal Albert Gorge Bridge near Plymouth, the Maidenhead Railway Bridge in Birkshire, The Clifton Suspension Bridge across the Avon Gorge in Bristol, and the Hungerford Bridge.

It's amazing, the things we can post about while waiting for Dai Bread to return to the board....

V/R
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Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:45 pm

Shapley wrote:...I'm shocked! Shocked! I tell you. What are they teaching in schools these days?...


I learned how to make acorns into flatbread. I learned that we should call horneytoads "horned lizards" but we still hunted horneytoads to put in teachers' desk drawers. I learned that any activity with no practical application is an "art" and the activities that produce a useful artifact are a "craft". I learned how to pan for gold. I learned that girls can't whistle (sadly, this information was imparted after I'd learned to whistle. Guess I'm not a girl.) I learned that all the dinosaurs are dead. I learned most of the times tables. I learned that division was too hard but reversed that conclusion when somebody finally explained prime factors to me. I learned how to throw a clay pot. I learned that most people draw better than I do. I learned that hardly anybody knew more words than I did. I learned that there are people who really can't spell :shock:.

I already knew how to tie my shoes and read a book.

Whaddya mean "these days", Shap - I'm about your age!
>^..^<
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Postby Shapley » Tue Oct 17, 2006 4:54 pm

Well, I don't know how to spell :shock: , either. I was never good at hieroglyphics, or iconography, or whatever they call it. :D

I did learn about Isambard Kingdom Brunel in school, in the Missouri Bootheel (no, it wasn't a one-room schoolhouse, and I didn't have to walk twenty miles, uphill, in the snow to get there). I read a book on British Engineering, did a book report on it, too, if I remember correctly. I don't know what it was doing in our library, probably donated by one of the engineers that came through building the power plant and aluminium plant there back in the '70s.

V/R
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