30Q #57 -bignaf

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Postby Shapley » Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:05 pm

Does the piece concern the Grim Reaper and a female?
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Postby 1st_oboe » Thu Nov 02, 2006 6:14 pm

Did the composer write two (or more) versions of the song?
Insert creative phrase here.
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:39 am

Shapley wrote:Bignaf,

This is what I found on the Rhine in Wikipedia:

Switzerland
The Rhine's origins are in the Swiss Alps in the canton of Graubünden, where its two main initial tributaries are called Vorderrhein and Hinterrhein. The Vorderrhein (anterior Rhine) springs from Lake Tuma near the Oberalp Pass and passes the impressive Ruinaulta (the Swiss Grand Canyon). The Hinterrhein (posterior Rhine) starts from the Paradies glacier near the Rheinquellhorn at the southern border of Switzerland. One of the latter tributaries originates in Val di Lei in Italy. Both tributaries meet near Reichenau, still in Graubünden.From Reichenau, the Rhine flows north as the Alpenrhein passing Chur and forming the frontier with Liechtenstein and then Austria, and then emptying into Lake Constance. Emerging from Lake Constance, flowing west as the Hochrhein it passes the Rhine Falls and is joined by the Aare river which more than doubles its water discharge to an average of nearly 1,000 cubic meters per second. It forms the boundary with Germany until it turns north at the so-called Rhine knee at Basel.
Emphasis mine


I guess that's the chance you take with interesting questions. I figured a river that begins in Switzerland and goes more or less northwest, will not be bordered by a country to Switzerland's east...

anyway, it's not called the Rhine there, yet. it's the Alpenrhein
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:45 am

Catmando wrote:Was Schubert's composition created prior to Beethoven's premiere of the "Choral" 9th Symphony?


23. no
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:46 am

navneeth wrote:This guy seems to have written nothing but for voice and piano!

Major scale?


24. no
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:50 am

Shapley wrote:Does the piece concern the Grim Reaper and a female?


25. nein
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:51 am

1st_oboe wrote:Did the composer write two (or more) versions of the song?

26. no
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:57 am

recap: piece for solo voice and piano by Schubert. written after 5/7/1824. not in major scale. not on "Charlotte Church" CD. doesn't concern grim reaper and maiden. only one version of this piece.
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Postby Shapley » Fri Nov 03, 2006 11:28 am

Is the composition based on a work by Sir Walter Scott?
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:15 pm

Shapley wrote:Is the composition based on a work by Sir Walter Scott?

27. no.
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Postby Shapley » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:26 pm

Well, I'm at a loss. There are over 700 lieder written by Schubert, and I can't find any reference to which are voice only or voice and piano. I tried using the Grim Reaper piece and the Walter Scott/Night on Bald Mountain/Fantasia connection looking for a Hallowe'en connection.

Is there a 'throwing in the towel' icon?
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Postby Catmando » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:39 pm

Is there a name of a girl in the title of the song?
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:40 pm

hint: all Schubert lieder are for voice and piano.

look at possible groupings for the lieder...
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Postby Catmando » Fri Nov 03, 2006 12:42 pm

Shapley wrote:Well, I'm at a loss. There are over 700 lieder written by Schubert, and I can't find any reference to which are voice only or voice and piano. I tried using the Grim Reaper piece and the Walter Scott/Night on Bald Mountain/Fantasia connection looking for a Hallowe'en connection.

Is there a 'throwing in the towel' icon?


Shap, check out allmusic.com

Also, although there are over 700 lieder, it was composed after 5/7/1824, thus that's only 4 years before Schubert's far, far too early demise at the age of 31.
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Postby Shapley » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:01 pm

hint: all Schubert lieder are for voice and piano.


I thought that, too. But I read the description of Ave Maria (which is based on Sir Walter Scott's poem Lady of the Lake, which says it was written for voice alone, so I'm puzzled.

The definition of 'lieder', which says it is for voice and piano, does not specifically exclude the possibility of being for voice alone by adding the word "particularly" into the mix.
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:16 pm

they meant solo voice and piano. I don't know a Schubert Lied without piano, and I've heard at least 100 of them.
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Postby Selma in Sandy Eggo » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:29 pm

Shapley wrote:...But I read the description of Ave Maria (which is based on Sir Walter Scott's poem Lady of the Lake)...


No, the Schubert Ave Maria is the usual Latin words. It's the same Hail Mary that gets said in so many Catholic churches, worldwide, gets into so many wedding services. I'm pretty sure the words were the same before Scott or Schubert wrote anything.

Of course, lots of non-Catholics know the words to the Ave, because of the music.
>^..^<
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Postby Shapley » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:40 pm

Here is a site I have dealing with it. Apparently we sing the prayer Ave Maria:

Ave Maria Gratia plena
Maria Gratia plena
Maria Gratia plena
Ave, ave dominus
Dominus tecum

Benedicta tu in mulieribus
Et benedictus
Et benedictus fructus ventris
Ventris tui Jesus

Ave Maria
Ave Maria Mater dei
Ora pro nobis pecatoribus
Ora, ora pro nobis
Ora ora pro nobis pecatoribus

Nunc et in hora mortis
In hora mortis, mortis nostrae
In hora mortis nostrae
Ave Maria!


(Latin text of the Ave Maria prayer)

To the music which Schubert composed for the poem by Sir Walter Scott:

Ave Maria! Ave Maria! maiden mild!
Listen to a maiden's prayer!
Thou canst hear though from the wild,
Thou canst save amid despair.
Safe may we sleep beneath thy care,
Though banish'd, outcast and reviled -
Maiden! hear a maiden's prayer;
Mother, hear a suppliant child!
Ave Maria!

Ave Maria! undefiled!
The flinty couch we now must share
Shall seem this down of eider piled,
If thy protection hover there.
The murky cavern's heavy air
Shall breathe of balm if thou hast smiled;
Then, Maiden! hear a maiden's prayer;
Mother, list a suppliant child!
Ave Maria!

Ave Maria! stainless styled!
Foul demons of the earth and air,
From this their wonted haunt exiled,
Shall flee before thy presence fair.
We bow us to our lot of care,
Beneath thy guidance reconciled;
Hear for a maid a maiden's prayer,
And for a father hear a child!
Ave Maria!


(German translation by Adam Storck from
"The Lady of the Lake" by Sir Walter Scott)

V/R
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Postby bignaf » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:42 pm

the Schubert original is mostly in german and is based on Walter Scott. it is often sung to the catholic words, but that's not original.
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Postby Catmando » Fri Nov 03, 2006 1:42 pm

Was it released post humous, as were many of Schubert's works?
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